Should cats sleep in the dark

Should cats sleep in the dark

You just got a kitten and it’s your first night. I can understand how you may be a little paranoid as to whether or not kittens can see in the dark or need a little light when they sleep. Should you leave a light on for your kitten at night? The answer to this question is no. You do not need to keep a light on for your kitten at night. This is solely due to cats having better night vision than humans do. If it makes you feel better leaving a small bit of light on for your kitten, then by all means go ahead. This is especially so for safety reasons.

Leaving a light on for a kitten can help prevent you from accidentally stepping on or kicking your kitten if you are walking around a dark room in the middle of the night. All in all, a little extra light wont hurt near your cat’s litter box, water, or food bowl in case they are thirsty or need to use the restroom at night.

Do Cats like to Sleep in the Dark or Light?

Cats, like humans, have a pineal gland. This gland actually regulates melatonin. This is the main reason why we get sleepier at night. So as a result of this gland, cats should also like to sleep in the dark since it helps make them sleepier. If you must keep a light on then I recommend keeping a small night light for safety purposes, especially if your cat likes to sleep in the middle of a room or floor. This will help prevent you from stepping or kicking them in the middle of the night.

Keeping the lights off when your cat sleeps is probably the best idea. Also try to keep a habitual pattern at night to help your cat sleep better. Try to make your cat sleep at around the same time and the same area so that your cat knows that it’s time to go to sleep.

Where Should Kittens Sleep at Night?

Bringing home a new kitten can be a very exciting time. You may have a hundred questions and one of them may be asking where you should put your kitten at night to sleep. Your kitten will first need to feel comfortable in their new home before they can sleep well.

It may take awhile for your kitten to first get used to their new surroundings so don’t get frustrated if you can’t get your kitten to sleep where you want at first. The main thing to remember is that a kitten wants to feel cozy, warm, and safe. If these three requirements are met, then you may even find your kitten in your closet snugging up against your dirty laundry.

You can help your cat fill all of these needs by providing a small cat bed with a warm center cushion surrounded by higher sides so that he can lay down and change positions freely. If you choose a bed that is a little bit too big for your kitten, then you can always make it more cozy by rolling up a blanket or two to line the inside of the bed.

Can You Leave a Kitten Alone Overnight?

If your kitten is under 6 months old then you should not leave them alone overnight. Someone needs to check on the kitten before bed as well as after they wake up, especially if they are left alone for 8 hours during the night. It’s also good to interact with your kitten throughout the day. They are constantly growing and stimulation is good for a growing kitten.

Once your kitten has reached at least 6 months of age, then they should be able to spend the day alone without too much worry. I would still recommend having someone check up on your kitten at least every 8 hours to make sure food and water requirements are met while you are gone.

Final Thoughts

Kittens do not need light in order to sleep comfortable or at all. It is best to keep the lights off to help stimulate natural melatonin production which in turn will help your kitten fall asleep.

It is best to start sleep training your kitten as early as possible by picking out a nice small cat bed. After you have a small cat bed, you will then need to find a place for your kitten to sleep. Select a spot in your home that is quiet and dark to place your kitten’s bed so they can feel the most comfortable.

A kitten under 6 months old should never be left alone for more than 8 hours at a time. Always arrange a pet sitter or someone to be at your home to check on your kitten to make sure they have enough food and water.

Should cats sleep in the dark

You just got a kitten and it’s your first night. I can understand how you may be a little paranoid as to whether or not kittens can see in the dark or need a little light when they sleep. Should you leave a light on for your kitten at night? The answer to this question is no. You do not need to keep a light on for your kitten at night. This is solely due to cats having better night vision than humans do. If it makes you feel better leaving a small bit of light on for your kitten, then by all means go ahead. This is especially so for safety reasons.

Leaving a light on for a kitten can help prevent you from accidentally stepping on or kicking your kitten if you are walking around a dark room in the middle of the night. All in all, a little extra light wont hurt near your cat’s litter box, water, or food bowl in case they are thirsty or need to use the restroom at night.

Do Cats like to Sleep in the Dark or Light?

Cats, like humans, have a pineal gland. This gland actually regulates melatonin. This is the main reason why we get sleepier at night. So as a result of this gland, cats should also like to sleep in the dark since it helps make them sleepier. If you must keep a light on then I recommend keeping a small night light for safety purposes, especially if your cat likes to sleep in the middle of a room or floor. This will help prevent you from stepping or kicking them in the middle of the night.

Keeping the lights off when your cat sleeps is probably the best idea. Also try to keep a habitual pattern at night to help your cat sleep better. Try to make your cat sleep at around the same time and the same area so that your cat knows that it’s time to go to sleep.

Where Should Kittens Sleep at Night?

Bringing home a new kitten can be a very exciting time. You may have a hundred questions and one of them may be asking where you should put your kitten at night to sleep. Your kitten will first need to feel comfortable in their new home before they can sleep well.

It may take awhile for your kitten to first get used to their new surroundings so don’t get frustrated if you can’t get your kitten to sleep where you want at first. The main thing to remember is that a kitten wants to feel cozy, warm, and safe. If these three requirements are met, then you may even find your kitten in your closet snugging up against your dirty laundry.

You can help your cat fill all of these needs by providing a small cat bed with a warm center cushion surrounded by higher sides so that he can lay down and change positions freely. If you choose a bed that is a little bit too big for your kitten, then you can always make it more cozy by rolling up a blanket or two to line the inside of the bed.

Can You Leave a Kitten Alone Overnight?

If your kitten is under 6 months old then you should not leave them alone overnight. Someone needs to check on the kitten before bed as well as after they wake up, especially if they are left alone for 8 hours during the night. It’s also good to interact with your kitten throughout the day. They are constantly growing and stimulation is good for a growing kitten.

Once your kitten has reached at least 6 months of age, then they should be able to spend the day alone without too much worry. I would still recommend having someone check up on your kitten at least every 8 hours to make sure food and water requirements are met while you are gone.

Final Thoughts

Kittens do not need light in order to sleep comfortable or at all. It is best to keep the lights off to help stimulate natural melatonin production which in turn will help your kitten fall asleep.

It is best to start sleep training your kitten as early as possible by picking out a nice small cat bed. After you have a small cat bed, you will then need to find a place for your kitten to sleep. Select a spot in your home that is quiet and dark to place your kitten’s bed so they can feel the most comfortable.

A kitten under 6 months old should never be left alone for more than 8 hours at a time. Always arrange a pet sitter or someone to be at your home to check on your kitten to make sure they have enough food and water.

Should cats sleep in the darkTurning out the lights when you leave the house can be a good habit to have from an economic standpoint, but leaving your cat in complete darkness can actually be very stressful for them. Here are three reasons why you shouldn’t leave your cat in the dark when you’re gone for the day.

Cats can’t see in total darkness

While it’s true that cats can see in the dark, it’s a common misconception that they can see in total darkness. Cats are not nocturnal, but they are crepuscular, which means they are most active at dawn and dusk. Although a cat’s eyes are able to capture and use 50 percent more available light than people, they cannot see at all unless there is some source of light in the room. After all, even the night sky has star shine and moonlight.

Your cat might get lonely

When you’re home during the day, your cat gets used to a certain level of activity. After a while, your cat associates noises and activities with your company, such as having the TV on, listening to music, and using the lights. If once you leave, everything goes dark and silent, your cat may start to feel abandoned.

You could trip

One less obvious reason to leave on a little light when you leave is to avoid tripping over your cat. If your light switch isn’t right by the front door, there may be a chance that you don’t see kitty waiting for you. Various toys scattered around the apartment also pose a tripping hazard that you might not see in the dark.

At the end of the day, switching off the lights reduces your carbon footprint, and your energy bill. If you’re not thrilled about the idea of leaving on all of your lights, consider getting LED nightlights that come on automatically once it’s dark or utilizing a lamp on a timer.

Worried about leaving your cat alone in the dark? Hiring a pet sitter to check on kitty can put your mind at ease, but please don’t forget to show us where your light switches are!


Candace Elise Hoes is a pet sitter and blogger at Katie’s Kitty. She is a graduate of the MFA Writing Program at California College of the Arts.

photo by Kartlyn Earth & ArtKN on flickr

Where should I put my cat at night?

Give your cat a comfortable cat bed in a spare room, in the corner of the living room (with a screen for privacy), or in the bathroom . If you do this, make sure you have access to water and litter wherever your cat is kept at night.

Is it OK to put a cat in a room at night?

If the cat is comfortable, you can leave the cat in the room at night . Simply locking them is not enough. You have to prepare the room, the cat, and yourself. You will need to take your time to adapt them to their new living environment and ensure that they never feel stressed.

Where do cats like to sleep in the house?

Cats love to sleep in the closet . For fragrant and clean clothes, knits are preferred. It’s an easy place to sleep in a quiet hideaway.

Is it cruel to keep a cat in a bedroom?

A cat can live in one room as long as it is as large as a large living room . It can meet the needs of cat litter, food, water, cat toys and more. Cats can be happy almost everywhere as long as they have access to what entertains you and your cat.

Is it cruel to lock cat out of bedroom?

Is it okay to keep the cat out of the room at night? Closing the door makes the cat frustrated . Not only do they limit their mobility, they also prevent them from seeing potential dangers. It is desirable to keep as many doors open as possible.

Can I lock my cat in the bathroom at night?

Yes, but you need to be careful . Cats like their space, and being trapped alone in the litter box all night can have a negative impact on their physical as well as their mental health. You need to take the necessary precautions to keep them safe.

Should I ignore my cat meowing at night?

In conclusion, when your cat meows at night, you must completely and completely ignore it in order not to encourage action . Keeping your cat busy at night can prevent it from becoming hungry or finding creative ways to get your attention.

Where should my kitten sleep at night?

Kittens should sleep in a warm, soft, quiet place at night. This could mean a cozy cat bed on the high side, a laundry basket with some of your favorite shirts, or a fluffy blanket that she can curl up. sleep well.

Do cats need their own room?

ASPCA recommends allowing 18 square feet of space per cat . Therefore, if you need to keep multiple cats, you need to provide extra space. The most important thing for cats is zoning. “Even in the largest homes, cats can be uncomfortable, especially with an open plan with few hiding places.

How do I change where my cat sleeps?

Set the tone that the bedroom is not a playground and keep all cat toys out of the room . Of course, cats can also find rolled socks and scraps of paper fun, so get rid of other potential “toys” as well. Keep the bedroom door closed while you sleep.

Do cats have a favorite place to sleep?

Your cat may prefer a small enclosed space, especially when sleeping . Again, this comes from the need to feel protected. Many cats love to sleep in a cardboard box surrounded on all sides. This means that there is only one entrance to keep your eyes sleepy, mitigating the vulnerability.

Do cats like clean rooms?

Cats really like clutter . It gives them a place to hide and play. Just keep things free from the potential dangers you’re doing, they’re okay.

Where should I put the litter box?

The toilet should be in a private and quiet place, but not in a dark and completely isolated place . Do not put the toilet next to cat food and water. Have toilets on all floors of the house so that cats don’t have to use the stairs to go to the toilet.

Do cats need a night light?

Pets don’t need lights, so you don’t have to keep cat lights on at all . Cats and kittens have stronger dark vision than humans, so don’t leave your pet cat lit at night. They are doing well at night with no lights on.

Where your cat sleeps on your bed and what it means?

Sleeping in your bed may have chosen a way for your cat to show you that they care . When your cat is always sleeping with you, they say they like to be with you and enjoy hugging. This is especially common when you meet a cat during the first 4-9 weeks of life when imprinting of the cat occurs.

What do cats do at night?

Night activities are a very common problem for some cat owners, such as biting or bouncing their ears or toes in bed, crossing sleeping owners, night vocalizations, furniture and / Or the owner at night or early morning.

Can I leave my cat alone for 2 days?

Many cats will be well on their own for up to 2 days . However, fresh food and water should always be available. For day trips, it is enough to fill up with food and water before departure. But if it’s longer than that, you’ll probably need an automatic feeder and a water dispenser.

Do cats sleep with you to protect you?

Sleeping with you provides them with safety and additional protection if predators launch a night attack . They sleep with you because they trust you, they know you are not dangerous, and you can also provide an additional layer of defense if needed.

What’s the average lifespan of a house cat?

13 to 17 years old is the life expectancy of indoor cats, but some cats have a much shorter life expectancy, while others live up to their twenties. One kitten, Cream Puff, has reached the age of 38! Cats don’t complain if they feel sick.

How often should I feed my cat?

“From 6 months of age to maturity, most cats work well by feeding twice a day .” When a cat becomes an adult cat, it takes about a year, and in most cases 1 a day.

2 feedings are appropriate. Older cats over the age of 7 should maintain the same feeding regimen.

How can I train my cat to sleep at night?

How to put your cat to sleep at night Try to wake up your cat longer. entertain your cat while you’re on the go. give the cat a small meal at bedtime. set another sleeping space. do not respond to requests unless necessary. be patient.

Is it OK to leave a kitten alone at night?

There is nothing cruel to put a kitten to sleep in a cozy, warm and safe environment (such as a kitten’s cage) until you wake up in the morning , but the location and type of bed is a stress-free night. ..

Can I put my kitten in a cage at night?

In general, happy, healthy, well-tuned kittens do not need to crate every night . If the kitten or cat has difficulty using the litter box properly, it may be best to keep the cat in a crate at night while the cat is training to use the litter box.

Should I let my kitten sleep in my room?

Many owners still choose to sleep with their kittens in bed, but it’s best to wait until they’re a little older and now give them their own space at night . Let your kitten sleep on you during the day to compromise.

What is a safe room for a cat?

A safe room is another room where you can start exploring a new home, such as an office, a spare bedroom, or even a bathroom . Some people like to use the utility room. However, we do not recommend using the utility room as the noise from the washer and dryer can scare new cats.

To ensure your kitten is comfortable in their new home, the first step is to set up a cosy, warm space so they feel safe and secure. This area is your kitten’s own and will help them to get to sleep on their first night.

Should cats sleep in the dark

When arriving home with your adorable kitten, your first instinct may be to lavish them with endless cuddles but it’s actually best to give your kitten some space. First, set up a sleeping area and allow your kitten to explore and get used to its new surroundings. Your kitten will need some time to get to know you and settle into their new space. If you follow our guidelines below, your kitten will soon happily adjust to your family and be sleeping peacefully through the night.

Where should my new kitten sleep?

A secure and comfortable room like the laundry is ideal, or you might even want to consider a pen or large crate so that you can control your kitten’s movements at night. Kittens love to be nice and cosy, so make sure there are lots of blankets, and that the bed has reasonably high sides to provide extra warmth. Make sure your kitten has access to a water bowl, food, and litter tray near their sleeping area. This room is your kitten’s space and they need to feel comfortable in order to adapt to your home.

Comfy cat bedding

Should cats sleep in the dark

Should I let my kitten sleep in my bed?

As tempting as it may be, avoid letting your kitten sleep on your bed or with the kids. As well as being dangerous for your kitten, cats carry some diseases that can be transmitted to humans. To avoid injury, it’s best to keep your kitten in a secure space while you’re both sleeping. If you allow your pet to roam free while they are young, you may find it hard to enforce bedtime in the future.

Should the light be left on or turned off?

Remember, cats can see in the dark a lot better than you or I can, so your kitten will have no problem finding what they need, even in minimal light. However, you can leave the light on or provide a night light on the first night while they adjust to their surroundings. An interesting fact about cats is that they love to be active at both dusk and dawn, so it will take some effort on your part to get yours to adapt to your schedule. Turning out the light when you go to bed can help to establish the sleep patterns with your home. This is very important if your kitten is going to become a happy member of the family.

What should I do when my kitten starts crying at night?

It’s almost inevitable that your kitten will cry for at least the first couple of nights when you bring them home. Remember, they’ve just been removed from their mum and littermates and they’re bound to feel a little bit lonely. The best thing you can do is keep your kitten feeling as safe and warm as possible. A great tip is to put a hot water bottle in their bed, as the warmth will help your kitten to relax and feel more comfortable – just make sure the bottle is covered and not too hot! Please do not use boiling water from the kettle.

Conclusion

If you take the time to provide your kitten with a safe and secure sleeping environment and encourage them to adapt to your sleeping patterns, your pet will become a well-adjusted cat in the long run. These helpful suggestions we’ve provided should get you on your way nicely. If you’re experiencing trouble getting your kitten to sleep at night, please book in a behavioural consultation at your local Greencross Vets who will be happy to help you resolve your problems.

By: Chewy Editorial Published: December 15, 2014

Should cats sleep in the dark

Where Should My Kitten Sleep?

The day you bring your kitten home is such an exciting time. You found your new family member, fell in love and now are welcoming him into your home. You promise this tiny being that you will do everything you can to help him live his best life.

When we adopted Annie and Eddie from the Grayson County Humane Society in Leitchfield, Kentucky, we were overjoyed to welcome them into our family. The kittens were already bonded from sharing a cage together, so they had each other to rely on as they adjusted to their new home.

Your kitten will need time to become comfortable in his new surroundings, so be patient. One thing kittens do is sleep a lot. But where will your kitten sleep?

A kitten desires to feel warm, cozy and safe while sleeping. Our house cats’ instincts are hard-wired from their wild ancestors. They have a primal need to feel safe from predators, even while sleeping safely in your home.

You can help your kitten feel safe while snuggled up by providing a small cat bed with a center cushion surrounded with higher sides so he feels protected. If the cat bed you choose is a bit big for your kitten, but will be perfect when he is older, you can add a rolled up soft blanket to line the interior, making the bed a bit cozier.

If you adopted two kittens, they will have each other to snuggle with, helping them to feel secure. You don’t necessarily need to purchase a cat bed, as there are many things you might already have around your house that will work just fine. A laundry basket or cardboard box with folded blankets or towels can do the trick. A carefully placed blanket by a window where the sun shines provides a perfect lounging spot, too.

Sleeping When You’re Home

During the day and evening, your kitten might prefer to snooze beside you on the sofa while you are reading or watching television. We fold up a soft blanket so when one of the kittens curls up, they sink in a little, allowing them to feel snug and secure.

Kittens seek warmth and sometimes you are the best heat source. Your kitten might prefer to sleep on your lap, on your chest or even on your shoulder nestled into the crook of your neck. We found that Eddie preferred to sleep on a folded blanket on the ottoman in front of the sofa, while Annie preferred to sleep as close as she could get to us. When we were busy working around the house we would often find them on the sofa snuggled up together in deep sleep.

While You’re Away, What’s A Kitten To Do?

When you are home it’s easier to keep an eye on your kitten. But we can’t always be home. So what do you do then? If you plan to be away from home for a few hours, you might consider placing your kitten into a kitten-safe room. Remember: When your kitten isn’t sleeping, his curiosity can get him into trouble. You will want to provide your kitten with a comfy sleeping area, cat food , water, a few favorite toys and a litter pan in the safe room

We opted to place the kittens in a crate to keep them safe when we were planning to be away from home. We placed two crates together held by plastic ties. One crate housed a litter pan on one side and a folded towel on the other. In the adjoining crate, we placed a couple soft folded blankets and a couple cat toys on one side to create a warm and cozy nest. On the other side, we placed their food and water – make sure this is further away from the car litter so that litter training your kitten is not interrupted.This setup worked well for us, and we were able to go out knowing the kittens were safe.

Kittens In Bed At Night, Or Not?

At night, you need your beauty rest, too, so where should your kitten sleep? If you choose to allow your kitten to sleep in bed with you, that is perfectly fine. Just keep in mind that once permitted to sleep in your bed, if you change your mind, it will be more challenging to get your little one to adjust to his own sleeping quarters. Cats are territorial creatures, and they will not like being denied access to where they were once permitted to sleep.

A warm purring kitten can be relaxing and help you nod off to sleep. If you fall asleep easily and sleep through the night this sleeping arrangement will work just fine, but if you toss and turn and have difficulty sleeping, you might consider placing your kitten in his or her own space to sleep.

Cats are notorious bed hogs and you might be surprised how much room your kitten will require when they feel relaxed and stretch out longer than you thought possible. Worse yet, we cat lovers are tender hearted and often reluctant to move a sleeping kitten to make ourselves more comfortable. You might find yourself clinging to the edge while your 4-pound kitten enjoys the warmth and comfort of your bed. As long as you are able to peacefully co-exist in the bed through the night, this sleeping option could be perfect for you.

If you don’t want your kitten to sleep in bed with you, it’s best to start out by showing your kitten where he will be sleeping and gently urge him to make a habit of sleeping in this same spot at night. Remember, your kitten’s needs are simple. He wants to feel warm and safe in a protected place. You might entice your kitten to settle down in his own space if you place a hot water bottle underneath a blanket or towel inside his cat bed or box.

Before we brought Annie and Eddie home, it had been a long time since we had a kitten in our home. When kittens aren’t sleeping they could be getting into mischief. We needed a plan so we could get some much-needed shut-eye. We utilized our crate setup for Annie and Eddie to keep them safe through the night for a few weeks while we all adjusted. The kittens were happy together, and we were able to sleep through the night.

Your kitten grows up so quickly. These early days are so special and will form the bond that you’ll cherish for years to come. Enjoy every moment. There is nothing like the sound of little paws scampering about your house, and the tiny mews and the gentle purr of your warm, happy, sleeping kitten.

Featured Image: Andy Roberts/Gallery Stock

Should cats sleep in the dark

Chances are your cat has some favorite sleeping spots. Maybe he sleeps in the rocking chair or prefers the sunny spot just in front of the slider. It’s a sure bet that you can find your cat in his favorite spots until one day when he’s decided to sleep somewhere else. Cats may change their sleeping spots for a number of different reasons, but if your cat is sleeping in strange places, this may also signify a health issue.

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Understanding cat sleep

If you’re looking for an animal who understands the value of a great sleep, then you only need to look at your cat. According to Catster, cats can sleep up to 16 hours a day, and older cats often sleep up to 20 hours a day. This inclination for sleeping comes from a cat’s evolution because wild cats would hunt and then sleep to conserve energy between their meals.

Although your cat may seem to be asleep all the time, cats are actually snoozing for about three-quarters of the time that they appear to be asleep. When snoozing, cats are getting the rest that they need, but they’re still alert enough to wake up in just seconds.

You’ll see that your cat develops particular sleeping habits both in terms of the times and locations where she decides to sleep. However, there are also some factors that may prompt your cat to change her sleeping patterns.

Your cat’s instinct

Cats seek out different places to sleep out of instinct, states Petful. In the wild, cats would sleep in different places as a way of varying their routines and protecting themselves from predators. This is the same instinct that prompts mother cats to periodically move their kittens to new locations in an effort to keep them safe. Rotating sleeping spaces in the wild had the added benefit of minimizing fleas and other parasites, keeping the cats healthier.

In the wild, hierarchy among cats came into play, and that instinct continues in today’s domesticated cats. Dominant cats claimed their sleeping spots first and would then allow more submissive cats to share those spots with them. A change in the hierarchy would prompt a change in the sleeping spots, so if you bring a new cat into the home, you’re likely to see your current cat sleep in different locations.

Temperature changes

You will probably notice that your cat’s sleeping locations often coincide with significant temperature changes. On cooler days, your cat may prefer to sleep in the sun that comes in through a window or may curl up in front of the radiator or stove. When the weather gets warmer, your cat will probably seek out cooler places to sleep, like a cool linoleum floor or a breezy bedroom. This behavior is normal and is part of how cats keep themselves comfortable.

Pain-related sleep changes

According to the Tufts University Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, a cat sleeping in strange places can indicate that the cat is in pain. A cat who has developed arthritis may seek out softer, more comfortable places to sleep. If a cat is in pain, she may try to avoid contact with humans by sleeping in areas that are hard for you to access, such as under the bed or in a closet.

Fear-based changes

Cats may also change their sleeping locations out of fear. A major stressor, like bringing a new animal into the house, may prompt a cat to seek out safer places to sleep. For instance, if you bring home a new dog, your cat who normally sleeps on the couch may start sleeping in higher locations, like in a cat tree or on top of a tall piece of furniture.

Signs of a sick cat

While there are plenty of logical reasons behind cats changing up their sleeping areas, a cat sleeping in strange places can also indicate that the cat is sick. If your cat suddenly sleeps in odd locations without any apparent reason behind the change, it may be time to head to the vet.

In addition to seeking out unusual sleeping places, a sick cat may demonstrate changes in his sleep patterns, such as sleeping much more or much less than usual. Pet Health Network states that if your cat suddenly changes from being up during the day to being up all night and vocalizing, he may be indicating that he isn’t well by showing these sick cat symptoms. Schedule a trip to the vet to get your cat checked out if you have any concerns.

Always check with your veterinarian before changing your pet’s diet, medication, or physical activity routines. This information is not a substitute for a vet’s opinion.

by Stevie Sparks ‐ September 25, 2021

Should cats sleep in the dark

photo: Anton Kraev on Unsplash

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Having cats sleep in bed with you seems cozy and appealing on a cold winter night. For people that love cats, having them sleep with you every night is often just assumed. A typical cat sleep schedule covers about 16 hours per day, so could they be good sleep companions at night?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that around 50 percent of pet owners in the United States allow their pet to sleep in bed with them. Studies show that nearly two-thirds of owners sleep with their cats. According to veterinarian Dr. Steve Weinberg, allowing your feline friend in bed with you can potentially calm anxiety and night terrors.

While cats are very cuddly, their biological clock may cause some issues with their bed partners. “The downside is that cats are nocturnal animals,” he explains. “The human sleeper may have their sleep interrupted in the wee hours of the night or be woken up at a very early hour.” Due to this, Weinberg says, sleeping with a cat can be counterproductive to a person’s typical wake-sleep patterns.

“Many cats like to play and will scratch at or even bite at the human feet moving around under the covers,” he shares. To combat this issue, play with your cat before bedtime to get some energy out!

If you also plan to share your bed with another pet, such as a dog, keep in mind that your cat may not like this arrangement and become territorial. Something to think about if your cat won’t be the only one enjoying some quality time with you!

While you may enjoy the company of your cat in bed, never let your cat sleep with a child under 5-years-old and keep them out of a baby’s bedroom. Also, if you or your partner suffer from asthma or allergies, your cat shouldn’t be allowed in the bedroom at all.

Something else to consider if your cat spends part of the day outside, be mindful of what they could be exposed to— such as worms, fleas, ticks, and mosquitoes. Outdoor cats come into contact with more disease carriers than their exclusively indoor counterparts. “All of these carriers have the potential to transmit diseases such as viruses, bacteria, parasites, and many other infections,” says veterinarian Dr. Jennifer Maniet. “Also important to note is that the litter box of indoor cats can also present a risk of disease for humans in the household.” Gastrointestinal worms, giardiasis, ringworm, toxoplasmosis, and hantavirus infection are just a few diseases that kitty can bring in. Checking your cat’s fur and skin for issues and regularly taking your cat to the vet for their immunizations is very important.

“Always have your pet checked as directed by your veterinarian to determine your pet’s overall health status and to make sure they remain disease-free,” Maniet adds.

Fortunately, cat to human disease transmissions are extremely rare. As psychology professor Hal Herzog once shared via Psychology Today, “I expect the odds that you will contract the plague or meningitis from sleeping with your [pet] are somewhere between your chances of being killed by a shark (one in 4 million) and being struck by lightning (one in 80,000).”

In our family, we always had indoor cats and they were allowed to pick any bedroom they wanted. Let us know in the comments if your cat sleeps in bed with you at night.

As long as you and your fur-baby doesn’t have any medical issues, your cat can lay claim to your bed! For interesting cat videos, check out our CatFancast channel on YouTube !

Cat naps have been a part of human life since the ancient Egyptians decided to emulate their revered pets’ behavior and grab a quick snooze. They were on to something, too.. Cat naps, which NASA says ideally should be between 10 to 20 minutes, can increase alertness, lower stress and improve memory, and give you a better boost than a cup of coffee at least for humans.

For cats, laziness is a way of life. When cats aren’t eating, scratching, or asking to be scratched, they are usually catching 40 winks—or 60 winks or maybe 80 winks. Cats are very good at staying well rested. In fact, according to Animal Planet’s website, “Cats are among the top sleepers in the animal kingdom.” Cats average around 16 to 20 hours of sleep a day, with older cats and newborns sleeping significantly more. Indoor cats tend to sleep more than outdoor cats, too, because there is less to do and less to worry about.

The reason that cats can take it so easy is that in the wild they are at the top of the food chain. That means they do not need to worry about being eaten while snoozing, which makes it easy to relax. It also means that when cats are ready to eat they will need to catch their dinner and that uses a lot of energy, energy that they have cleverly been saving up by sleeping all day. In the wild after cats chase down their prey, they eat a protein-packed meal and settle in for another nap. They don’t need to spend hours grazing like cows or fishing salmon out of a stream like bears. For cats, life is mostly a cycle of eat, sleep, and repeat.

House cats of course don’t have to hunt for their food. That doesn’t mean their instincts have changed, though. “Domesticated felines, like their wild counterparts, sleep about 16 hours a day, on a pretty regular schedule, saving up their energy for the hunt,” writes Animal Planet. “You never do know when the gourmet food’s going to run out.” This genetic makeup is also why cats tend to be most active in early morning and during the twilight hours when they are instinctively more on their guard waiting for predator and prey, even if they live in style in a 12th floor condo.

Should cats sleep in the dark

Boreal Owl standing on the moss in the wood. Image credit: Stanislav Duben/Shutterstock.com

  • Frogs can see in color in the dark.
  • Foxes are nocturnal.
  • Deer are crepuscular animals.

Nocturnal animals are those who hunt and roam at night, and generally sleep their daylight hours away. Because these animals often go after their prey or find sources of food at night, after the sun has long set beyond the waning hills, it is imperative that they have a superior ability to see in the dark.

Some of these animals are usually found in the forest or fields, but others can be easily seen in cities at night time. Here is a list of eight animals that can definitely see better than you or I, once the night falls.

8. Raccoon

Should cats sleep in the dark

Raccoon feeding in garbage at night. Image credit: Mircea Costina/Shutterstock.com

Raccoons are fiesty things. They are best known for invading your campsite, tossing over the garbage can in the driveway and leaving an enormous mess while generally wreaking havoc in urban neighborhoods after dark. They do this because they seek out their meals at night. Raccoons have superb night vision that allows them to creep easily through abandoned alleyways and underneath your front porch.

When you look at a racoon in the night, you can often see their eyes glowing. This is a reflective layer on their eyes that magnifies objects in front of them. The only drawback to a racoon’s sight is that it is not so good when considering distances.

Up close, however, and in the dark, it gets five stars.

7. Red Foxes

Should cats sleep in the dark

A red fox in a forest at night. Image credit: Boyan Georgiev Georgiev/Shutterstock.com

Red foxes also hunt at night and are so versatile, they can live in both the countryside and very urban areas. Red foxes love to pounce on unsuspecting rabbits, squirrels, birds and other small rodents. They are even known to crunch into crickets and caterpillars, as well as other insects and even fish.

In order to catch their prey when prowling after dark, red foxes must use their incredible night vision. The foxe’s eyes have a layer that reflects the light back into the eyeballs, magnifying their vision to be twice as strong.

6. Owls

Should cats sleep in the dark

Southern white faced scops owl (Ptilopsis granti) at night, Botswana. Image credit: Bobby Bradley/Shutterstock.com

Owls are infamous for being phenomenal predators. Not only can they turn their heads almost a full 360 degrees but they also have enormous eyes that allow a lot of light in, allowing them to catch unsuspecting fish, reptiles, insects, spiders, mice, and many other small mammals.

Just as many other of the other creatures on this list do, owls have the same reflecting layer in their eyes called a tapetum lucidum. This gives them superior eyesight in the dark.

5. American Cockroach

Should cats sleep in the dark

A large cockroach on wooden plank at night time. Image credit: Kakteen/Shutterstock.com

Cockroaches are pretty amazing living things. It is estimated that they have been living on Earth since the Carboniferous period which was about 320 million years ago. Talk about some wild family history!

You might not think of cockroaches when it comes to great eyesight, but they do well in the dark. These insects have a unique system in place for seeing without light. Instead of reflecting the available light to enhance it, cockroaches absorb whatever light is available very slowly, at approximately one photon per ten seconds.

Roaches see things in time-lapsed composite images when it gets too dark. They take in bits of light over a longer period of time and then form an image based on this “time-lapsed photo”.

4. Porcupines

Should cats sleep in the dark

A group of porcupines foraging at night. Image credit: 5213P/Shutterstock.com

These prickly quill lovers are also nocturnal animals. Porcupines forage for their food in the nearby forest at night and sleep the day away in hiding, in hollow trees and underground burrows. Porcupines love to chow down on the inner bark of trees during the winter time and they change their diet with the seasons, always eating strict vegetarian fare as herbivores.

3. Frogs

Should cats sleep in the dark

A tree frog. Image credit: Bartholo/Shutterstock.com

If you have ever stayed the night close to a pond that was home to a pesky bullfrog, you know just how active these guys can be once the sun sets. Frogs can make a lot of noise and they also have night vision that is so keen, they are able to see colors even when we would perceive the scene to be comprised of complete and total darkness.

How do they do it? Frogs are able to see so well at night due to a special type of cell that is present in their retinas.

2. Cats

Should cats sleep in the dark

If you are a cat owner you know first hand that friendly (and unfriendly) felines are proud night prowlers. You might hear the doors creak in your house, or the cups falling off the kitchen counter as little Missy jumps up to take a drink of your leftover tea while you are trying to get some sleep. Cats do this because they are “looking for prey” at night in your home, even if none is there. In order to do this in the dark, cats have more rods and cones than we do and as such, they are said to be able to see in about one-sixth of the light we need to see the world clearly.

1. Deer

Should cats sleep in the dark

Wild deer at night. Image credit: Skynavin/Shutterstock.com

Have you ever caught a deer in your headlights? If you have, hopefully all turned out alright for both you and the deer. Like others on this list, deer also have that reflective layer at the back of their eyes that makes them glow like a demon when light is shone in their face in the dark. This gives them night time super powers, when it comes to seeing. This is advantageous for deer who like to prowl at dusk and dawn in search of the best foliage to munch on.

Deer are called crepuscular animals. This means that they generally sleep during the day, and search for their food when the sun is about to set, and into the night. This can keep them safer from their predators. Deer move to and from their feeding areas at dusk and dawn, which is why you have a better chance of seeing them just before the sun sets than you do midday.

almostthere

TCS Member
Thread starter

OK! I am both new to this forum and a new “cat person”. All my life I’ve had dogs but until recently, never a cat, but that has changed.

To begin, I started feeding an adult pregnant cat last year. She had 2 babies of which one lived. In the perusing months two more wandered into my life and now I fine myself feeding a total of four. My small home is a rental and my landlord does not want any cats inside the house so I feed and water they outside. In the course of 6 months or so I have managed to catch each of them individually and had them neutered/spayed.

I have built a small structure (I call my cat condo) for them that has a litter box on the ground level and a feeding platform above the litter box. Then it has a roof to protect the food and litter areas from rain. I also feed two of them on the top roof area.

What I’m wondering is where do outside cats sleep at night? During daytime they sometimes are in my yard and sometimes I see them in a neighbors yard so they wander around as I suspect cats are inclined to do, but I have no idea where they sleep at night.

I would like to provide a place that they would use but have no idea what they would like.(especially during inclement weather.)

I am very concerned that they have a safe place to keep dry & warm. Should note that my home is in a mild, warm climate so I’m mostly concerned with rain.

Yes, you love your pets. But you might need to rethink letting them co-sleep with you.

Mercey Livingston is a health and wellness writer and certified Integrative Nutrition Health Coach. She’s written about fitness and wellness for Well+Good, Women’s Health, Business Insider, and Prevention.com among others. When not writing, she enjoys reading and trying out workout classes all over New York City.

As a dog mom, I know how tempting it is to let your fur baby sleep with you in the bed. Pets love being with their humans, and especially at night time, they love to cuddle. Some people enjoy having pets sleep with them, but many people opt to have pets sleep in their crates or other beds. So is there only one right way when it comes to letting your pets sleep with you?

We all need more sleep these days, and sometimes getting good quality sleep feels impossible. Just like newborns , it’s no secret that pets can wake you up at night and disturb you. Whether you already have pets or are considering getting one in the future, you might be curious about what’s the best sleeping arrangement for you and your pets. Ultimately it’s a personal choice, but if you’re looking for some insight on why people may choose to sleep with pets (or not), keep reading.

The case against pets sleeping in your bed

Pets can be a source of dander and aggravate allergies if you have them.

Dander and allergies

If you suffer from allergies, you might want to think twice about letting pets like dogs or cats sleep in the bed. Dr. Kunjana Mavunda, a pediatric pulmonologist, warns that pet dander can irritate allergies, especially when you sleep in the same bed. “Even if a person has no allergies to pet dander, if they choose to sleep with a pet, it will be prudent to get special protective mattress and pillow covers with zippers that completely cover the mattress and pillow,” says Dr. Mavunda. That can help keep your mattress and pillow clean and prevent dander from lingering.

Since dander can easily spread across your pillows, blankets and sheets, Dr. Mavunda also suggests limiting the amount of other items on your bed and washing everything once a week in hot water if you do let pets sleep there.

When it comes to letting my own pet on my bed, if she’s just been outside for a walk through mud, dirt or even wet sidewalks I won’t let her get near my white comforter. But even outside of bad weather, my pup can get pretty dirty just running around the house and going out for her normal potty breaks in the grass (which is when pet wipes come in handy for dirty paws).

Depending on how dirty your pup gets, you might have a strict no-bed or co-sleeping rule. Again, it comes down to personal preference and how you feel about your pet potentially tracking in dirt from the outdoors into your bedroom.

Sleep disruption

Some pets are more active at night, which can wake you up and mess up your sleep . If you’ve ever raised a young puppy, you are very familiar with the reality of being woken up several times a night for potty breaks (or simply because your pup is bored). Even though dogs tend to sleep better when they are older, there’s still a case to be made for pets disrupting your sleep.

Even though it’s normal to have your sleep disrupted from time to time, ongoing disturbances can lead to bigger issues like not being able to fall back asleep or stay asleep, or restlessness throughout the night when you need consistent deep, uninterrupted sleep. If you continually find your pets waking you up throughout the night when they sleep with you, you should reevaluate sleeping with pets if they are keeping you from getting the rest you need.

Safety

Pet experts who recommend crate training usually encourage it for dogs to help with housebreaking the dog, among other benefits. Safety is another concern — I remember when I first got my puppy and I felt guilty putting her in the crate, but then I knew she’d be safer there than in my bed where she might fall off or worse, like if I accidentally hurt her when I was sleeping (she was a tiny two-pound pup).

Now that she’s older, I still feel more safe with her in the crate, knowing that she won’t potentially fall and hurt herself or wake me up to play in the middle of the night.

If your pet isn’t disturbing your sleep or contributing to allergies, then you should share a bed with them if it brings you comfort.

The potential benefit of having pets sleep in your bed

If your pet is not disrupting your sleep and waking you up throughout the night, you could argue there are several benefits for letting them sleep with you. Since so many people love their pets and find comfort from their presence, you may even sleep better with them near you.

Some research backs this up, showing that owners that sleep with their pets reported that it does not disrupt their sleep, and some single people reported that pets helped them sleep better.

If you’re still on the fence about whether or not to let your pets sleep with you, remember that it’s a personal choice. Weigh the potential benefits and drawbacks for you, and go with the choice that helps you sleep best, since sleep is so important for overall health.

The information contained in this article is for educational and informational purposes only and is not intended as health or medical advice. Always consult a physician or other qualified health provider regarding any questions you may have about a medical condition or health objectives.

There are lots of reasons why a cat might hide. Cats hide to feel safe, and in order to protect themselves from things they perceive as dangerous or stressful so it’s important to find out the reasons why your cat is hiding.

Cats as a species are self-reliant, so when faced with a difficult situation your cat would naturally prefer to avoid it rather than charge in and fight.

Your cat will hide when there is something, or someone, nearby that is causing them concern. They may be frightened or just wary about something unfamiliar and might want to keep out of the way, just in case. If you leave them to it you will usually find that they will come out of hiding once the threat has gone or they have realised that whatever it was they were frightened of isn’t actually scary at all.

However, if your cat is hiding for prolonged periods of time this could be an indication that they are distressed about something more permanent in the environment. This could be anything but is often other cats in the home or even a person who is over-enthusiastic in the way they interact with them. Take a look at our advice on stress relief for cats for more information to help you identify potential sources of stress for your cat.

The other significant reason why a cat might hide comes from their instinct to be self-reliant. An injured or unwell cat will often withdraw and find a safe and enclosed space where they can remain until they feel better, so if your cat continues to hide, you should make an appointment with your vet to rule out or diagnose any medical issues.

Where might my cat be hiding?

For a cat to choose a hiding place it must feel both private and secure. Some cats will choose an elevated position to hide, such as on top of a wardrobe. This has the added benefit that they can still observe what is going on without being seen. Other cats prefer to retreat to a ground level hiding place, somewhere as far away as possible from any activity, or other cats, usually in a dark, enclosed space.

Often not being able to see the threat is enough to reassure your cat, so you may see your cat thinking they can’t be seen when they simply have their head under a towel. You might see this behaviour when you take them to the vet, for example!

Your cat might also use their hiding places as sleeping or resting areas when they are relaxed and not feeling in any danger. It’s a good idea to follow some basic ‘cat etiquette’ and not to disturb your cat while they are using one of their hiding places (unless it is essential to do so) and to avoid disrupting or cleaning the areas too frequently.

Should I help my cat hide for comfort?

Hiding places are one of your cat’s basic needs. Providing a selection of possible options, such as some open cupboard doors, areas under beds, cardboard boxes and gaps behind sofas will give your cat a choice of places to go when they feel scared.

How to make a cat hideaway

Cats love having small spaces to hide and get away from it all, as it helps them to feel calm and secure. If you have a slightly nervous cat, this could be the perfect refuge for them.

Watch our video to find out how you can make a hideaway for your cat using an old t-shirt and a box.

If you have more than one cat you will also need to make sure that there are enough options to prevent the more assertive cat from taking up all the locations and excluding the others. If you have young children, it’s also important to make sure your cat has places to go that aren’t accessible by them.

All cats, irrespective of their age, benefit from having somewhere safe and secure to go when they feel the need, and an elderly cat will be no exception. Older cats can suffer from stiff and painful joints and jumping up onto high places can become difficult or even impossible.

Make sure that several ground level places are available (warm with soft bedding) and if possible, provide some gradual steps up to their usual high place, just so that they have the choice.

Recognising early signs of pain in your cat is important in keeping your cat happy and healthy

Read about the basic strategies your cat will use to protect themselves in times of anxiety

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By: Shanna Freeman & Dr. H. Ellen Whiteley | Updated: Jan 26, 2022

Checking Your Cat’s Eyes

Learning more about your cat’s eyes in general can you determine if he’s healthy. Let’s break down each part of the eye to find out what constitutes normal and what doesn’t.

A cat’s pupils can look like anything from vertical slits, to the classic spindle-shaped “cat’s eye,” to full dilation — big black dots that take up all of the colored part of the eye. Certain diseases, including trouble in a cat’s nervous system, can cause the pupils to be noticeably different sizes. A cloudy, milky or filmy look to the pupils might be a sign of cataracts, viral ulcers or other vision problems.

The iris is the colored part of the eye. Cats usually have some variety of green, yellow or blue eyes. Occasionally, a cat will be “odd-eyed”; each eye is a different color. If you notice changes in your cat’s iris or the appearance of splotches of other colors, contact your vet. It’s not unusual for the iris to change with age. Old cats’ irises may degenerate and take on dark, freckle-like spots, but this isn’t always a sign of trouble.

The “white” of the eye is officially known as the sclera. Obviously, this should be white (perhaps with some small blood vessels visible). Yellow or “bloodshot” sclera, ulcers or splotches of color, and signs of damage (like scrapes or bruises) are indicators of trouble.

Conjunctiva is the pink, fleshy stuff under the eyelids that helps hold the eye in place. You usually don’t notice the conjunctiva unless it swells up, in which case it may protrude from under the eyelid, giving the eye a “meaty” appearance.

The third eyelid, or nictitating membrane, appears when your cat blinks or closes his eyes; this wonderful adaptation moves from the inside corner of the eye to cover the front surface of the eyeball. Again, it’s something you rarely notice unless there’s a problem. One of the ways cats announce that they don’t feel well is when their third eyelids are up — that is, they’ve moved partially across the eyeball.

If you notice any type of injury or abnormality with your cat’s eyes, take him or her to the vet immediately to get it checked out.

Cats run hotter than humans, but that doesn’t mean that they can’t get fevers. How can you tell if your cat is feeling feverish? Find out next.

It’s not a secret: cats love to sleep. They do it often, and they do it well. Sometimes you may hear your sweet little kitty making sleeping sounds that are reminiscent of a distant chainsaw. It may get you to wondering: is snoring normal in cats?

When Is Cat Snoring (Probably) Harmless?

Cats have sleep cycles like humans do. They have a rapid eye movement (REM) phase, where you may see twitching whiskers, “running” feet, and jerking facial muscles. Cats also have a deeper, non-REM phase of sleep, where they are fully-relaxed. This is the time when many people will hear their cat snoring.

If you only hear your cat snoring once in a while, there is probably nothing to be concerned about. If it happens all the time, but your cat has always done it and it isn’t accompanied by any other signs of illness, it is probably not a medical concern. Below are examples of some cats that may snore often:

  • Overweight cats have a higher tendency to snore. While this is not likely to be an immediate health concern, obesity can lead to many other serious health conditions. Take a look at this article for tips on helping your cat lose weight.
  • Brachycephalic cat breeds snore more than other cats. These are cats with flatter faces, such as Persians. Their shortened nasal passages and elongated soft palates can lead to noisy sleeping.
  • Your cat may just be sleeping in odd positions that leads to temporary snoring.

When Is Cat Snoring a Concern?

Snoring in cats is generally not a problem, but there are times when it could indicate the presence of a medical issue. If you notice any of the following signs accompanying your cat’s snores, make an appointment with a veterinarian right away:

  • Discharge from the eyes or nose, sneezing, or sores on the nose may all be indications of an upper respiratory infection. In this case, your cat may be snoring because of mucous in the nasal passages.
  • Decreased or absent appetite or lethargy: these are always signs of illness in cats and need to be checked out.

Noises that sound like snoring while your cat is awake:

  • Stertor: This is a low-pitches noise that sounds like a snore.
  • Stridor: This is a high-pitched noise that can occur when your cat is either breathing in or breathing out.
  • Wheezing: This is a high-pitched noise that occurs in the lungs during respiration.
  • Snorting: this is a quick inspiration of air that occurs in the nose.
  • Coughing
  • Sitting with the neck extended and breathing rapidly: your cat should be seen by a veterinarian immediately if you see this behavior, as it indicates labored breathing.
  • Breathing with the mouth open (panting) is abnormal in cats and should be evaluated by a veterinarian.
  • The above signs may indicate that one of the following conditions is present:

    • Upper respiratory infection
    • Feline asthma: this causes swelling of the tissues in the cat’s lung passages. It may be secondary to allergies, parasites, obesity, or heart disease.
    • Polyp or tumor in the nasal passages or sinuses
    • Severe dental disease
    • Heart disease

    Most of the time, cat snoring is harmless and even cute. Just be aware of the signs that it is something more, and get your cat to the veterinarian right away.

    Here’s an especially adorable kitty with a super cute snore:

    Updated 12 January 2019 By Pawesome Cats 19 Comments

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    Should cats sleep in the darkFor centuries, black cats have been associated with superstition and folklore. Historically, in the UK and United States, black cats were believed to be evil and associated with witchcraft. In China, a black cat was a sign of hard times and poverty, and in Europe if a black cat jumped on a sick bed it was a sure sign that death was near.

    Many of these superstitions about black cats continue to exist today, and for this reason black cats often have the lowest rates of adoption at rescue organisations.

    Black cats aren’t only associated with bad luck and evil though, in some cultures they are celebrated and seen as a sign of good luck.

    Black Cats Bring Good Luck

    You may remember being told that it is bad luck to have a black cat cross your path. Whilst this superstition remains true is the United States and parts of Europe, in other countries (such as the UK, Japan and Australia) it’s the opposite and a black cat is a sign of good fortune and good luck.

    It is believed to be a sign of good luck and future prosperity if a black cat enters your house, if a dark and mysterious black cat meets you at your front door, or if you stroke a black cat three times. And if you dream about a black cat, it is a sure sign that good luck is coming.

    ” data-medium-file=”https://i0.wp.com/pawesomecats.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/beautiful-black-cat.jpg?fit=300%2C214&ssl=1″ data-large-file=”https://i0.wp.com/pawesomecats.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/beautiful-black-cat.jpg?fit=740%2C529&ssl=1″ loading=”lazy” src=”https://i0.wp.com/pawesomecats.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/beautiful-black-cat.jpg?resize=740%2C529″ alt=”Black cats aren’t only associated with bad luck and evil, in some cultures they are celebrated and seen as a sign of good luck | Black Cats – Good Luck or Bad Luck?” width=”740″ height=”529″ srcset=”https://i0.wp.com/pawesomecats.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/beautiful-black-cat.jpg?w=740&ssl=1 740w, https://i0.wp.com/pawesomecats.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/beautiful-black-cat.jpg?resize=300%2C214&ssl=1 300w” sizes=”(max-width: 740px) 100vw, 740px” data-recalc-dims=”1″ />

    Image: Alan Turkus via Flickr

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    Pirates and Sailors

    In the 19 th century sailors kept black cats on ships as they believed it would bring them luck. Fisherman’s wives kept black cats while their husbands went away to sea, believing that this would ensure their husbands safe return.

    Pirates thought that if a black cat was walking in their direction, it was a sign of the bad luck that was to come. However, if a black cat was walking away from a pirate, it was seen as a symbol of good luck. If a black cat walked onto a pirate ship and then walked off it again the ship was doomed and likely to sink on its next voyage.

    Should cats sleep in the dark

    Image: woodleywonderworks via Flickr

    Romance and Weddings

    In Japan, a black cat is thought to improve your love life. Superstition says that a woman with a black cat can expect to have many suitors, which means many a man keen to marry them.

    It is also believed that a bride will have a happy married life if a black cat sneezes near her on her wedding day.

    Black cats are often given as wedding presents to bring the newly wedded couple good luck, often in the form of ornamental black cats purchased as wedding gifts, rather than a living black cat.

    Should cats sleep in the dark

    Image: Frostdragon via Flickr

    I have personally had the good fortune to know two beautiful black cats, who crossed my path multiple times each day and brought nothing but joy and happiness.

    Are you superstitious about black cats bringing bad luck? How do you react to a black cat crossing your path? Have you adopted a black cat? Please share your stories and superstitions about black cats.

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    Summer Mayberry says

    So my husband was leaving early for work one morning and he left the front door open. He turned his back to put stuff in his work van and he heard a commotion. When he turned around he saw a black cat running out of our house, hitting the door on the way out. Then the cat ran into the street and just sat there and stared at him. We don’t own a black cat, or any cat for that matter. We own three dogs but they were in the bedroom with me at the time (this was about 3-4 in the morning) and they didn’t even know. My husband thinks that we for some reason just had a cat living in the house but didn’t know about it (which I think is impossible with our dogs). I think it ran in when the door was open but then ran right back out. Looking at this from a spiritual stand point, or in terms of lucky or unlucky, can anybody interpret what this may mean? For our house, for us as a couple, or just for him?

    I have one cousin who throws change at them if they cross his road and another one that stops his car, turns it off and turns on and off the lights 3 times!

    Saw black cat entering from window and starring at me with big eyes

    Jonathan Shaw says

    It’s Friday the 13th and a black cat has been hanging out with me all day. I fed her sardines. 🙂

    We have a black cat since she was 3 weeks old. She is very affectionate and curious about anything. She sleep with me in my bedroom and gave me kisses like sniff on my lips or cheeks and a lick on my fingers sometimes. What I think is that if you love your pet, your pet will love you in return. Don’t know about good luck or bad luck and all is well.

    I have a stray black cat we named salem he decided to live here about 5 years ago, but most the time he lives on our deck in a heated pet house because he doesn’t like noise. Then another black cat a 6 month old kitten came around and never left her name is kiwi this was about two years ago. I truly believe that they protect us and that is why they came.

    Animals that hunt, mate, or are generally active after dark have special adaptations that make it easier to live the night life.

    There’s a reason why people who stay up late are called night owls. That’s because owls are always awake and active when the sun is down. This is called nocturnal behavior, and it’s common among many animals. They become more active at night to hunt, mate, or avoid heat and predators.

    How do animals see in the dark?

    Nocturnal animals have evolved physical traits that let them roam in the dark more effectively. The eyes get bigger and the pupils widen. Owl eyes, for example, are so big that they can’t move in the socket, but their wide pupils help them collect more light.

    A reflective layer called tapetum sits behind the retina; any light that passes through the eye reflects back onto the tapetum. The retinas contain rod cells, which pack their DNA in a way that turns each cell’s nucleus into a light-collecting lens. This is different from how the rods of non-nocturnal animals or humans work.

    Night Creatures

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    Galapagos giant tortoises rest in a pool of mud in Volcan Alcedo’s crater on Isla Isabela. Many animals are nocturnal to avoid the heat of the day.

    Galapagos giant tortoises rest in a pool of mud in Volcan Alcedo’s crater on Isla Isabela. Many animals are nocturnal to avoid the heat of the day.

    Other adaptations

    Sight isn’t the only feature nocturnal animals rely on. Some depend on other senses to adapt to the darkness.

    Animals like owls and large cats have specialized hearing to hunt at night; owls’ ears are offset and ears of large cats are highly maneuverable.

    Many nocturnal animals, though not nocturnal birds, have a good sense of smell and often communicate with scent marking. That sense of smell comes from the Jacobson’s organ located in the roofs of their mouths. When an animal pulls its lips back and grimaces, it enhances the sensitivity of the organ.

    Some animals, like snakes, use taste to navigate and locate prey.

    Is It Ok To Crate Cats At Night

    Many cat owners find it difficult to keep their cat awake at night. This is because the cat’s freedom of movement is restricted. If the cat is allowed to roam the house, it can be kept in a cage for the night if there are enough food and space. The following conditions can be used to place the cat into a cage: Teach them how to clean litter boxes. Recovering an ill cat Introduce a new family member Feral cat domestication Cats don’t need to be kept in a cage at night.

    It is also not advisable. After the kitten phase, cats will become more comfortable with your routines and sleep as you do. There are several acceptable reasons to keep a cat in captivity overnight: After surgery recovery Rest after a illness For the following reasons, you should not crate your cat over night: It must be stopped from running around Litter training

    Where should my cat sleep at night?

    You can give your cat a comfy cat bed, either in the spare bedroom or in an area of the living space with a screen to protect it. This will ensure that your cat has water and litter each night.

    Can cats be trained to sleep in a crate at night?

    Cats will be able to manage their time if they are left alone. It is possible to train your cat to sleep through the night. This will eliminate the necessity of keeping it in a cage. It won’t bother your cat if it sleeps the same time as you. Play and food are the best ways to train your cat to fall asleep.

    How long can a cat stay in a crate?

    A healthy adult cat can be carried in a carrier for a journey of less than 6 hours. You should let your cat go for a few minutes every so often if you are on a longer trip. You don’t want your cat to stay in the carrier too much.

    Looking for an answer to the question: Should i let my cat sleep with me? On this page, we have gathered for you the most accurate and comprehensive information that will fully answer the question: Should i let my cat sleep with me?

    All that sleeping is in your cat’s genes. That sleeping habit is a result of the cat’s evolution, nutritional habits and physiology. In the wild, cats have to hunt in order to eat, and the stalking, chasing and killing of prey burns a lot of energy. Sleeping helps cats conserve energy between meals.

    As an alternative for letting your dog sleep on your bed, you may want to let him sleep at the foot of your bed. It’s normal for your dog to want to sleep in your bedroom because the room smells like you.

    One possible explanation is that cats may be attracted to our body heat. When there’s no crackling fire or heating vent to curl up next to, perhaps our bodies are the next best thing. (And given that most of our body heat escapes from our heads, that may provide a more narcissistic motive for my cat’s nighttime posturing.)

    Why cats sleep next to their owners?

    Strengthens the bond – Cats who sleep with their humans are closer to them. This comfortable snuggle helps them feel more trust and safety with their owners. It’s warm – For those who get cold easily, a cat in the bed is the perfect feet warmer.

    Is it OK to cage a cat at night?

    In general, a happy, healthy, well-adjusted kitty shouldn’t need nightly crating. If your kitten or cat is having difficulty making proper use of its litter box, it might be best to keep your cat in a crate at night while you train her to use the litter box.

    Why do cats purr and then bite you?

    The most common reason why a cat bites or lashes out is overstimulation or over excitement. Meaning that it is enjoying the time with you, so much so that it gets to the point where it feels too good. . In fact cats can purr when they are upset, scared, anxious or even threatened.

    How can you tell if a cat has imprinted on you?

    When cats don’t feel threatened by other cats, they will show affection by rubbing on them, sleeping near them, and being in their presence. If your cat replicates those behaviors with you, Delgado says it has officially imprinted on you. They rub against you.

    Is it OK to let your cat sleep with you?

    The bottom line is that, yes, there are some risks associated with snoozing with your cat—but, as long as you know about them, it’s perfectly okay! “If you aren’t allergic and your cat sleeps soundly at night, then by all means, cuddle up with your kitty,” Dr. DeWire says.

    Should I growl at my cat?

    You should not hiss at your cat as it will scare the little pet and will eventually scared of coming in front of you. Movement, eye contact, tail and head bumps, and hissing are all ways cats communicate. When you mimic your cat’s language, they’ll notice when they’re doing anything wrong sooner.

    Is it bad to lock your cat out of your room at night?

    Many cats will become irritated because the door locks at night, when they are alone. . As you can expect, this will have a psychological effect on the cat and cause it to be concerned. It’s time to consider what’s going on mentally if a cat cries while shut out of the bedroom.

    Why do cats stretch when they see you?

    Asides from being a greeting behavior, a cat might stretch towards you in order to sniff your outstretched hand. This will stimulate the secretory glands in his cheeks and allow him to deposit his scent on you by rubbing his cheek against your hand. This is a good sign that he is happy!

    Do cats like sleeping with humans?

    The reasons for this are varied, but generally speaking, it is the person who cares for them each day. This bond is important to your cat as they are social creatures that need affection and attention from their owner. By sleeping with you, it is another way for them to show their love.

    Why Are Cats Ears Cold

    Hypothermia can lead to the appearance of cold ears in cats. If the ears feel stiff and cold, this could be a sign of frostbite. Cats can feel anxious about their new home if their ears aren’t cold. Low ambient temperatures are the first thing that causes a cat to have his ears cool. The cat’s thermoregulatory ability, which reduces the circulation to the blood and keeps the internal organs heated, kicks in when it is too cold.

    The temperature will drop to the ears which are at the end of the body. Hypothermia can occur in cats with cold ears. When it was very cold, snowing, or icy outside they went. The water is on their skin and coat. Air conditioner Hypotension is caused by allergic reactions, poisonings and drug use Anesthesia for a long time Hypovolemic shock caused by bleeding Hypovolemic shock is the cause of concussion.

    This happens when the hypovolemic heart attack causes the brain to shut down and produce blood loss. These include hypothermia, cold ears and metabolic acidosis. They also cause bradycardia, hypotension, blood coagulation changes, and hypotension. Pet cats can be very warm and will have an average temperature of around 68 degrees. Because it regulates temperature changes and helps to maintain them at their optimal level, the ears of cats are essential.

    If your cat is hot or its ears become hot you can monitor their temperature. You don’t need to panic if your cat’s ears feel a little bit cold. However, if your cat’s ears seem much more chilled than normal, and the temperature is below 97F, it could be a sign that your cat has an illness or discomfort. The ears of cats may seem colder than others, as they have more exposure to the elements and are less delicate than their lower bodies. It is possible for mild to moderate hypothermia to occur simultaneously with signs our cats may have a cold.

    These are the symptoms: Stiffness in the muscles Tremors Dry skin Breathing difficulties Slow, deep breathing Lethargy Slow, awkward movements You should sleep Your cat should have their ears trimmed and free from odors. Your cat may scratch or shake their ears if they are having trouble hearing. You should check for any flaking, blisters, foul smell, or discharge. You may find a dark, gritty substance in their ears. These are parasites that can cause itching, and they are easily spread to other cats.

    People like their home to be chilly in winter, so that they have blankets. But is it okay for cats? The breed of cat you have will determine the right room temperature. The normal temperature of cats is between 99.5 and 102.5 degrees F.

    However, their needs for warmth vary depending on how much they weigh and the fur that they have. Long-haired cats will tolerate a warmer home. A short-haired, or thin cat may need to be kept warm. A Sphynx3 or other hairless cat will make you feel cold, even though your house is not very warm. It’s important to be aware of the symptoms and provide warm areas for your cat.

    Should my cat’s ears be warm or cold?

    Are Cats’ Ears Hot or Cold? The ears of a cat should be relatively warm. This is because the cat’s body temperature can range between 100-102.5 degrees Fahrenheit.

    Are cats ears supposed to be warm to the touch?

    The temperature of a cat’s ears can change depending on its activity and the environment. It is normal for ears to feel warm if your cat is happy and healthy.

    What temperature should cat’s ears be?

    102.5 degrees Fahrenheit

    Why does my cat feel cold to the touch?

    Colder extremities A cat with colder extremities might feel less warm than usual, such as his nose, ears and tail. Hypothermia-prone cats may experience sluggishness, dilated pupils and shallow breathing. These symptoms may indicate that your cat needs immediate medical attention.

    It doesn’t need to be Halloween season for some of our feline friends to rock their vampire fangs. And just as polydactyl cats are adored for their extra toes, there are many cat lovers (myself included!) who are crazy about cats with vampire like fangs. For those cats who have long fangs, it gives them a wildcat look without having any wild cat DNA coursing through their veins. Have you ever wondered why some cats have long fangs? Keep reading to find out the answer!

    Should cats sleep in the dark

    First, a break down on cat teeth…

    Your average feline friend has 30 permanent teeth, and when they were just wee little kittens, they had 26 deciduous teeth—AKA milk teeth. As they mature, those pearly permanent whites come into play. Usually their canine teeth—those fang teeth—will measure around 1 cm in length. Your cat has four pronounced canines, and those are actually their most important teeth as they’re used for hunting. (You know, that food bowl that’s always filled is the modern day cat’s preferred style.)

    Interesting little factoid for you? Your feline friend actually doesn’t have the ability to chew their food. This is because they don’t have flat molars like we humans do. So, essentially, your cat is tearing up their food as they eat it. Want to know what else makes your cat the fierce hunter that they are? Their canines even have a “bleeding groove” which is meant to allow the blood of their prey to bleed around the tooth and not choke the cat. So, yeah, your cat is basically a tiny badass even though you supply them with all their meals! While cats are meat eaters, just make sure that you are feeding them plain meat and it should contain minimal fat and bones. So if you are wondering, “can cats eat salami?”, well a few bites won’t hurt, but excessive intake of it can be fatal to cats.

    Should cats sleep in the dark

    And those itty bitty tiny rows of teeth in between their fangs are what are referred to as their grooming teeth. I’ll just let you guess what those are used for!

    Think about it like this. If your cat was living in the wild, and they had no meals provided to them on a daily basis, they’d find a way to survive, no questions asked. Size doesn’t always matter when it comes to cats and their teeth, either—even with big cats. For example, the black-footed cat, which is certainly the smallest of all the big cats, is arguably the fiercest hunter in the wild and they only reach 4 lbs. at maturity.

    Should cats sleep in the dark

    So, why is it that some cats have long fangs?

    It seems that black cats are more prone to having these vampire like fangs that we admire. And, since they already have dark coats, it makes them look even cooler! In regards to the fangs in general, it seems that for some cats they are retaining physical characteristics of their less domesticated ancestors. Yes, of course they know you’re going to feed them and they won’t be forced to eat you in your sleep. And just because they have those vampire teeth doesn’t mean they’ve got a taste for sucking blood either.

    In addition to black cats often having long fangs, many cats with Asian heritage seem to have this trait, too. For example, the Siamese and the Oriental Shorthair often have longer fangs than the average house cat. Obviously some of these long fangs are more presentable than others, and there are times when they are just slightly noticeable. The longest I’ve seen would be Monk the Vampire Kitty, whose vampire fangs are an impressive 3/4″ long! Oh, Monk, how I love you…🖤

    The good news is, if your cat has long fangs, this doesn’t mean that there’s anything “wrong” with them. They just happen to have longer fangs and are holding on closely to their fierce cat DNA of the past. Just admire them for their beauty—but keep in mind they are a feline assassin ready to slay! If you feel as if your cat’s canines are an issue, however, it’s always good to take them in to be seen by their veterinarian. Should a cat lose a tooth, it won’t regrow. It’s so important for us to ensure that their teeth are nice and healthy—even if they are a tad long! (More on dental care here!)

    Should cats sleep in the dark

    Handsome Monk the Vampire Cat

    Want to see some of my favorite vampire kitties? Check out Monk, Horst, and Loki Kitteh here on Cattitude Daily!

    Updated Jun 22, 2017

    Should cats sleep in the dark

    If you’re lucky enough to have loved enough cats, you’ve probably been initiated into the club of humans whose cats have lived with, and eventually succumbed to, kidney failure. Kidney failure is that common. And that deadly. But as most of this club’s members will attest, getting a diagnosis of chronic kidney disease doesn’t have to be a tragedy.

    After all, cats with kidney disease often live for years beyond their initial diagnosis. To be sure, most do not. And it’s worth noting that some cats are diagnosed only in the disease’s final stages; when there’s not much that can be done beyond offering simple comforts to an end-stage patient’s last days –– or euthanasia, of course.

    Still, it’s not all doom and gloom. And I speak from much experience, both as a veterinarian and as someone who’s invested lots of time, energy, and emotion into managing her own cats’ last months with kidney disease.

    But even if your cats have never suffered through kidney failure (also commonly referred to as renal failure or chronic renal disease), it’s worth thinking about. Because (let’s be honest), if you love cats like some of us do, you’ll almost surely have to face this issue at some point.

    To that end, I’d like to offer what I hope is a super-helpful list of things to consider when you’re dealing with this disease:

    #1 Urination and Drinking

    These are usually the first symptom owners of chronic renal disease cats notice: Large volumes of urine clotting the clumping kitty litter. And lots of water downed in record time. Though these are sad signs of kidney disease, they’re also an important indicator of the kidneys’ continuing ability to function.

    #2 Nausea and Vomiting

    When kidneys decline, they can no longer efficiently excrete lots of toxins. That can lead to a major rise in some very nauseating chemicals in the blood. Fortunately, this nausea can be assuaged by a growing arsenal of veterinary drugs designed for this purpose. So, if your kidney-issue cat isn’t eating, ask your veterinarian about these new-fangled nausea-damping drugs.

    #3 Fluids

    The mainstay of most chronic renal failure patients’ care (especially in their advanced stages) is fluid therapy. Subcutaneous fluid administration is the most common route of fluid input in the long term, though intravenous fluid administration is typically preferred at the outset and may be necessary intermittently throughout the course of the disease.

    #4 Anemia

    The kidneys make a hormone (erythropoietin) that triggers red blood cell production. This means that when the kidneys suffer, the blood suffers too. Moreover, the excess of fluids these patients sometimes receive means their blood is always more dilute than it would otherwise be, effectively lowering the number of red blood cells making the rounds.

    Anemia (low red blood cells in the circulation) is common to chronic renal failure cases and can be managed with nutritional supplementation of iron (to a small degree) and with synthetic or natural hormone supplementation (darbopoetin or erythropoitin, respectively) to a larger degree. But these drugs have side effects, so cats must be managed carefully when they receive them.

    #5 Phosphorus

    Phosphorus is not your friend during kidney failure. Levels of phosphorus in the blood will rise as the kidneys’ ability to excrete it declines. Consequently, calcium levels rise to match the phosphorus load—and the calcium has to come from somewhere, right? The calcium-rich bones are subsequently leached of their stores, weakening them severely in some cases. That’s why oral, phosphorus-binding drugs are needed to help rid the body of its excessive levels. Ask your vet about these if your cat’s “P” levels are high.

    #6 Weakness

    Let’s be honest. Cats with renal disease tend to be geriatric. So they’re not only creaky because of arthritis and maybe even a bit touched with dementia, they’re also suffering from all the renal disease issues of anemia, malnutrition, nausea, and weak bones. Which, of course, makes them weak.

    #7 Loss of Appetite

    A subset of the nausea and vomiting issue (see #2), poor appetite (referred to clinically as “anorexia”) is often the most frustrating aspect of chronic renal failure in cats. That’s why owners will do anything to bring back their kitty’s dinnertime exuberance. Drugs to stimulate appetite can be had. Some are actually moderately effective even when nausea-damping drugs have made no headway. Ask if your kitty’s a candidate.

    #8 Weight Loss

    Yeah, if you’d been feeling nauseous for weeks or months before your diagnosis, you probably would’ve lost a significant percentage of your body mass too. Keeping tabs on weight is crucial for kidney failure kitties.

    #9 Blood Pressure

    Here’s a stat for you: Sixty-one percent of cats with chronic renal disease have high blood pressure. But most cats never have this issue addressed (usually through drugs, like amlodipine).

    Truth be told, that’s because the other symptoms seem far more pressing, and because we’ve already taken steps to reduce blood pressure through the dietary changes we recommend (see below). Still, I’d consider blood pressure a minimally addressed consideration in kidney failure cats. For some, drugs can make a very real difference.

    #10 Diet

    By far the most controversial aspect of chronic renal disease therapy, nutritional treatment is nonetheless the most popular approach to mid- to long-term management of feline kidney patients. Low in sodium and protein, these diets are engineered to reduce blood pressure and limit the buildup of toxins.

    Unfortunately, getting a nauseous patient to eat is complicated by these diets’ unappetizing approach to protein reduction. After all, our carnivorous cats are built to relish their protein-rich meats. Luckily, plenty of research has gone into these diets and lots of manufacturers are coming up with increasingly appetizing approaches.

    By the way, cooking for chronic renal failure kitties is often a fruitful endeavor. Enlist a veterinary nutritionist for this.

    #11 Specialists

    Finally, let me mention one oft-overlooked feature of treating chronic kidney disease patients: All owners of chronic renal failure patients are welcome to request the advice of a board-certified internal medicine specialist.

    Furthermore, owners who choose to consider dialysis (still available only in very limited geographic regions) and the possibility of a kidney transplant (available to limited numbers of renal failure cases) are urged to seek out advanced services as early after the diagnosis as possible.

    Breed & Health Resources

    Pet Health Conditions

    One of a cat’s most distinctive traits is the amount of fur she sheds. Almost all cats that have fur shed it — some more than others — and 9 felines from the Breed Center received a rating of four stars or higher, meaning they shed more than the average amount of fur.

    1. American Bobtail Cats

    Should cats sleep in the dark

    (Picture Credit: Getty Images)

    2. American Curl Cats

    Should cats sleep in the dark

    (Picture Credit: Getty Images)

    The Curl stands out for his distinctively shaped ears, but even without them he is a striking cat with a sweet expression, and a silky coat that can be long or short and any color, including such exotic shades as chocolate tortoiseshell smoke, silver patched tabby and lilac lynx point. Read more about American Curls.

    3. Chartreux Cats

    Should cats sleep in the dark

    (Picture Credit: Getty Images)

    The Chartreux has the sturdy, powerful body of a working cat wrapped in a short, thick, water-repellent coat. Besides his beautiful fur, his most distinctive feature is his deep orange eyes, set in a rounded, broad head. Read more about Chartreux Kitties.

    4. Cymric Cats

    Should cats sleep in the dark

    (Picture Credit: Cattime)

    The Cymric has a long, soft, silky double coat that comes in many different colors, including various solids, tabbies, tortoiseshells and calicos. Read more about Cymric Cats.

    5. Nebelung Cats

    Should cats sleep in the dark

    (Picture Credit: Getty Images)

    The Nebelung looks much like the elegant yet muscular Russian Blue, but with a thick, shimmering, medium-length coat. Read more about Nebelung Cats.

    6. Ragamuffin Cats

    Should cats sleep in the dark

    (Picture Credit: Cattime)

    He is characterized by his large size, large walnut-shaped eyes that can be any color, sweet expression, and variety of colors and patterns. Read more about Ragamuffins.

    7. Ragdoll Cats

    Should cats sleep in the dark

    (Picture Credit: Getty Images)

    Ragdolls stand out for their large size, semi-long coat in a pointed pattern, and sparkling blue eyes.
    Read more about Ragdolls.

    8. Russian Blue Cats

    Should cats sleep in the dark

    (Picture Credit: Getty Images)

    The Russian Blue stands out for his coat color. To the uninformed, he might look gray, but in cat show terms he is an even, bright blue with silver-tipped hairs that make him seem to glisten. Read more about Russian Blues.

    9. Siberian Cats

    Should cats sleep in the dark

    (Picture Credit: Getty Images)

    The Siberian is notable for having a long triple coat with guard hairs (the outer coat), awn hairs (the middle part of the coat) and a downy undercoat. Read more about Siberians.

    Do you have a cat that sheds a lot? Tell us about her in the Comments below!