Should i brush my cat

Your cat is constantly licking herself, but it’s nothing to be worried about. In fact, she’s just grooming herself, which is perfectly normal behavior. Sometimes, however, your cat needs help with grooming those spots she just cannot reach. That’s when you need to step in and do regular brushings to help her out.

Should i brush my cat

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Knowing how often to brush your cat will depend on how long her fur is and how much help she needs grooming. You’ll help with reducing hairballs, getting rid of dead hair, avoiding skin problems, and much more.

Why brush your cat?

Cat’s hair grows in cycles, and at the end of a cycle, they have a lot of dead hair that can end up all over your house or turn into a hairball that your cat ingests. Plus, regular brushings can help you better spot fleas that may be on your cat.

If your cat is older and has trouble grooming herself, you’ll be helping her out a great deal by brushing her. You’ll also be able to bond with your cat by showing her that you want her to be comfortable and happy.

How to brush your cat

First, you’ll need to choose a brush that is suitable for your cat. For a longhaired cat, invest in a slanted slicker brush or a mat breaker. For a shorthaired cat or a cat with medium-length hair, use a dual-sided brush or a shedding comb. Both longhaired cats and shorthaired cats could benefit from a mitt brush or a shedding blade.

You’ll want to brush your cat when she is relaxed. To remove the dead hair, brush against the direction in which your cat’s hair is growing. Then, switch directions, and as you’re brushing, get rid of any excess hair.

Let’s say your cat has skin problems, like dandruff. If you notice white flakes when brushing your cat, ask your vet what to do. Likely, you’ll have to put your cat on a diet high in omega oils, rule out any parasitic issues, make sure your cat is properly hydrated, and determine if your cat has any allergies. If you see any other skin problems occurring, call your vet right away to ensure that your cat is healthy.

How often to groom

How often to brush a cat depends on what kind of hair your cat has. Ideally, longhaired cats should be brushed every single day, because their hair tends to get matted easily. If you have a medium-haired or shorthaired cat, brushing her daily or several times a week is recommended.

There is always a risk of grooming too much, however, which can cause bald patches or may irritate your cat’s skin. If you notice any skin problems, contact your vet as soon as possible.

Reading your cat’s body language

You want to do regular brushings for your cat, but you aren’t sure that she actually likes them. That’s why learning how to read your cat’s body language is so important.

If your cat is ball-shaped and trying to look small, then she is anxious or fearful. If her body is facing you and she has a normal posture, then she is feeling good and should be receptive if you try to brush her. If she is standing sideways and her back is arched, then she is in an aggressive mood.

Figuring out why your cat may be anxious is critical. If she is in an aggressive mood, let her play with her toys and don’t attempt to brush her. You need to catch her at the right time, which is when she is in a relaxed mood, in order for the brushing to be successful.

Additional cat grooming tips

Along with regular brushings, your cat needs to be cleaned and groomed in other ways as well. If your cat smells or gets dirty, then you should bathe her. If your cat has had a lot of earwax or ear infections in the past, then you may need to clean her ears with a solution that your vet recommends. Don’t clean your cat’s ears if they are inflamed or red, and never use a Q-tip.

Should i brush my cat

Since cats tend to jump all over the place, they can easily scratch their paws. Regularly inspecting your cat’s paws and looking for any signs of injury is important. You should trim your cat’s nails 10 to 14 days is recommended, but be sure to only clip the white part of the nail and not the pink part, where the blood vessels and nerves are located.

Making sure your cat has clean, healthy teeth is an important part of the grooming process, too. Check to make sure her gums are pink and firm and not red or white. You can buy a toothbrush for your cat and brush her teeth regularly. You should also make a habit out of checking your cat’s eyes. The area surrounding her eyeball should be bright and white. If you notice any crusty substance building up, wipe her eyes with a wet cotton ball away from the corner of her eye.

Should i brush my cat

If your cat is not used to regular grooming sessions, then she may not react so positively when you first try to brush her. Never try to force your cat to be brushed if she resists. If immediate grooming is vital, make an appointment with a professional groomer or veterinarian to evaluate the situation and perform it properly.

But if your cat does not protest too much, here are some expert recommendations on how to brush a cat at home and how to make it an enjoyable experience for both you and your kitty.

Preparing to Groom Your Cat

Before brushing, check the condition of your cat’s coat. Your cat’s coat should be free of bald patches or signs of fleas or signs of ticks. Her skin should also be free of unusual bumps, wounds or color changes. If something looks suspicious, it’s best to have your veterinarian take a look.

After you’ve made sure that your cat has no skin issues, you can prepare for your grooming session.

Rachel Diller, owner of Urban Sophisticats in Littleton, Colorado, certified feline master groomer and approved trainer for the National Cat Groomers Institute, recommends setting up the area with all the tools you need first. You don’t want to get your kitty in the right position and then scramble for tools when you realize you don’t have them.

Choose the Right Brush

Diller explains, “Cats typically have a variety of coat types. Their coats can be long, thick, thin, curly, dense, short and, of course, any combination based on their parents.”

Choosing the right cat brush depends on the type of fur you’re dealing with and what your cat prefers. Linda Schmoldt, groomer, owner of Spiffy Kitty Cat Grooming in New York and Fear-Free Certified Professional, says, “Pick a brush your cat likes. Try out a bunch of different ones. There are rubber brushes, rakes, slicker brushes and more.” Schmoldt also recommends trying the KONG Cat ZoomGroom multi-use brush for a massage-like experience.

Diller recommends using the Safari coarse comb and the Resco professional ergonomic comb for all hair types. She says, “I use both of these combs for all coat types. The only issue with longer hair is that you may pull more, unintentionally. So just go slow and easy; remember, you want the cat to enjoy this long-term.”

Basics for Brushing a Cat

Schmoldt recommends daily brushing for long-haired cats and weekly for short-haired cats.

Schmoldt says that the key to brushing a cat is figuring out the strategies that work for both of you. “Pick a calm, quiet time. Gently brush while providing treats or words of gentle encouragement. If kitty is wiggly, try different locations in the home or different times of day.”

When you’re ready to start the brushing session, Diller says, “I generally take a metal comb, (like the Resco professional combination comb) and start around the neck. You can gently hold the kitty around his/her shoulders at first.

Schmoldt explains, “Most cats enjoy being brushed around the head, neck and shoulders. Many cats dislike being brushed on the rear or underside, so be cautious brushing those areas, or you might get scratched.”

Diller agrees that “the most sensitive areas are under the armpits, belly, rear legs and especially the tail.”

Diller says that if you hit a snag with your comb, you should put the comb down and use your fingertips to pull the hair apart. You don’t want to stress your cat out by yanking on their coat.

“Don’t brush too hard or use jerky, rushed movement,” says Schmoldt. “Stop when kitty asks you to stop. Don’t force it.”

Dealing With Mats in Your Cat’s Coat

Mats in your cat’s coat are essentially clumps of knotted fur, and unlike a single tangle, they will feel like a dense piece of carpet in your cat’s otherwise soft fur.

Matting can range from minor to severe but is always irritating for your cat and should be safely removed. Brushing regularly can prevent mats from occurring in the first place.

If you’ve found a mat, Diller emphasizes the importance in safely using the proper tools or having a professional handle difficult mats. “Any kind of mat splitter has potential to slice the skin open under matted fur.”

Diller warns, “Never, ever take scissors to the knots. It’d be safer to just take the comb and gently but quickly pull the mat out of the hair. This, of course, depends on the mat’s severity.” If you’re unsure, its often best to let the experts take a look.

“When in doubt about how to brush your cat, hire a groomer. We’re here to help,” says Schmoldt.

Positive Reinforcement During Grooming Sessions Is Essential

Brushing is not only a chance to keep your cat’s fur looking fresh and clean and to reduce the amount of hair that’s shed around your home, but it’s also an opportunity to bond.

Make the brushing sessions relaxing and enjoyable by turning them into regular bonding activities. “Treats help. I like Hartz Delectables tube treats. You squeeze the tube—like toothpaste—and the kitty licks the end of the tube,” says Schmoldt.

When you treat your cat during a grooming session, they’ll begin to associate the experience with goodies, so they’re likely to be more willing next time you want to brush him.

Should I brush my cat’s teeth? The short answer is, yes . Over 50% of all cats over the age of three have developed periodontal disease as a result of plaque and calculus (tartar) buildup on their teeth. Periodontal disease cannot be eliminated, but it can be slowed down considerably with home care, especially if you brush your cat’s teeth regularly. Periodontal disease begins as gingivitis, which is inflammation of the gums. This is most noticeable as a pink or red stripe along the gumline of the larger teeth in the back of the upper jaw. Plaque on your cat’s teeth thickens and mineralizes over time to form calculus (tartar), which sticks to the teeth very tightly and cannot be dislodged with brushing. The surface of the calculus is very rough, which allows even more plaque to form. Plaque buildup on the other hand can be slowed down with regular brushing, which then minimizes calculus (tartar) development. The idea is to remove the softer plaque before it turns into tightly bound calculus.

If left untreated, gingivitis will progress into more severe forms of periodontitis that damage the supporting structures of the tooth, including the bone around the tooth and the periodontal ligament that holds the tooth in the bony socket. This process is painful for your cat, and will lead to tooth loss over time. So, yes, it is wise to brush your cat’s teeth regularly, but we realize this is easier said than done. Unlike dogs, many cats will initially resist your efforts to brush their teeth.

We recognize that some cats will never let you brush their teeth, no matter how hard you try. But with patience and persistence, most cats will let you do enough brushing to be of benefit. So, what are some steps you can take to make tooth brushing an easier experience for both you and your cat?

Tips For Brushing Your Cat’s Teeth

1. Use the right tools

The easiest way to brush your cat’s teeth is with a specially designed cat-specific toothbrush and pet toothpaste. Smaller brushes made specifically for cats are much easier to use than the brushes designed for dogs. Human toothpaste is not made for pets and can irritate their digestive tract if swallowed. Keep in mind that human toothpaste is not meant to be swallowed and no one has figured out how to get pets to spit their toothpaste out! 🙂 Pet toothpastes also come in a variety of flavors that are desirable to cats, which helps to make the brushing process easier and more pleasurable for your pet. While each cat has their own individual taste preferences, the poultry, seafood and chicken flavors seem to have the best acceptance in cats. We recommend the CET brand of pet toothpastes made by Virbac because of the wide variety of flavors and their dual enzyme system that helps control plaque forming bacteria. They also make a small angled toothbrush designed specifically for use in cats.

2. Start young

Earlier is always better when it comes to acclimating your cat to tooth brushing. Kittens are usually less resistant to brushing, and let you establish a regular home care routine.

3. Find a comfortable place

The environment you’re in while brushing can make a big difference in your overall brushing experience. Find a quiet place where your cat is comfortable, such as your lap or their favorite resting spot to make the process easier.

4. Start slow

In the beginning just put a little of the toothpaste on the brush and let your cat lick it off. You might need to try several different flavors until you find one that they like. Once they are licking the toothpaste off the brush, place the end of the brush slightly into the mouth while they lick it off. You might need to do this for a couple weeks until they focus on the toothpaste as a treat and stop worrying about the fact it is on a toothbrush that is in their mouth.

5. Use a gentle brushing technique

Most cats won’t really allow you to open up their mouth wide enough to brush the inside surfaces of their teeth. If your cat does, count yourself lucky. Focus on cleaning the outside, or cheek-facing surfaces of the teeth; especially the teeth in the upper jaw. You don’t need to pull the lips back at all if you are using a small brush made for cats, you can simply slide the brush inside the cheek. Make sure you brush the larger back teeth and the canines first since they tend to have plaque and calculus (tartar) build up more quickly than any other teeth. Your cat might not allow you to brush for very long, so focus on these most important teeth first.

6. Be Realistic

Some cats will simply never let you brush their teeth, period. While brushing is very beneficial for your cat’s dental health, it is not worth battling your cat to get it done. You and your cat should have a good relationship; we don’t want them to run and hide whenever they see you coming with the brushing supplies. Having said that, with patience and a gentle approach, over half of cats will allow some level of brushing.

Professional Teeth Cleaning for Cats

In addition to regular brushing, your cat should also have regular visits with a veterinary dentist to have his or her teeth professionally cleaned to help protect against periodontal disease.

Veterinary Dentist in Montana

Dr. Tony Woodward is the only board-certified veterinary dentist in all of Montana and is highly experienced in treating dental disease—and the good news is that you don’t need a referral to have your pet seen by Dr. Woodward. If you suspect that your cat has a dental infection, all you need to do is call our Bozeman office and schedule an appointment . Dr. Woodward is on-site here in Bozeman full-time to handle all of your cat’s dental needs.

Images used under creative commons license – commercial use (1/19/2021) Pexels

Contact & Scheduling

Phone: 406-599-4789
Appointment Location:
2401 Riata Rd
Bozeman, MT 59718

For many of us, brushing, flossing, and visits to the dentist are a normal part of our regular hygiene routines, but what about our pets? It’s not uncommon for feline owners to ask, “Do I need to brush my cat’s teeth?”

Should i brush my cat

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According to the American Veterinary Medical Association, the condition of your cat’s mouth can play a big part in his overall health and wellness and can lead to, or be the result of, additional health problems. That’s why routine check-ups are important and dental care between veterinary visits is essential, which includes brushing.

Cats can’t come out and tell us when they have a toothache, so it’s up to us to be proactive about their dental health. So, “Should I brush my cat’s teeth?,” you might ask yourself. According to the experts, all signs point to yes!

Why brush your cat’s teeth?

To put it simply — you should brush your cat’s teeth because it keeps her healthy. According to Catster, periodontal disease is the most common oral health issue that cats face. This issue is caused by the gum disease gingivitis, which manifests when plaque sticks to the teeth’s surface, and can eventually reach the bony tissue underneath the gums. When left untreated, periodontal disease can lead to infection, abscesses, and even tooth reabsorption by the gums, all of which can be incredibly painful.

If you’ve noticed that your cat’s mouth seems sensitive lately, it’s highly recommended that you take her in for a visit with the veterinarian. Possible signs of periodontal disease include pawing at the mouth, drooling, bad breath, or only chewing his food on one side. Additionally, your cat may refuse dry food if the problem becomes too painful.

To keep your cat healthy and happy, always make his dental health a priority with regular brushing and dental check-ups with his doctor.

How to brush cat’s teeth

Before you begin brushing your cat’s teeth, you’ll want to acclimate her to this strange, new routine — especially if she seems squeamish or fussy over having her mouth handled. Try building a pleasant routine to help her associate only good things with having her teeth cleaned at home.

Should i brush my cat

Start by settling in one of her favorite spots, like a comfortable chair or a spot in the sun, and hold her in your lap so that she’s comfortable. Turn off the phone so you aren’t interrupted by the ring tone noise and the temptation to see who it is and interrupt your session.

Then, occasionally touch her mouth and lift her lips before you start brushing to show her there’s nothing to be scared of. If she’s especially worried, you can try placing a bit of her favorite food or a little tuna water on her toothbrush or the tip of your finger to help her associate the brush with a positive association.

Once it’s time to brush, apply a small amount of water or pet-safe toothpaste onto a cat toothbrush, which can be found at most pet stores. You can also make natural cat toothpaste at home. (Never use human toothpaste on animals, because the fluoride and other ingredients can make them sick!)

If your pet absolutely won’t tolerate a brush, a small bit of gauze wrapped around your finger will work as well. Next, open your cat’s mouth and gently brush the cheek-facing parts of his teeth, along with the molars and canines. (But don’t tell your cat she has teeth called “canines.”)

How often to brush?

Ideally, your cat’s teeth are getting brushed every day. If that’s not practical or possible, however, any brushing is better than no brushing, so just do your best to brush them as often as you can. If her brushing is admittedly infrequent, be sure to disclose that information to your vet during her annual check-up and definitely mention any changes you may have noticed in her health or behavior since her last visit.

Ask your vet about cat treats and foods that not only provide nutrition, but also some teeth cleaning. In addition, ask for recommendations for chew toys that might help clean or strengthen gums and teeth in a cat.

How often for professional cleaning?

Much like us, even the most diligent oral hygiene routine for your cat must be supplemented with a visit to the pros. Many experts suggest scheduling a dental checkup for your cat once a year if possible, which can prevent or reduce the buildup of potentially harmful conditions like gingivitis or gum disease.

Check your pet health insurance plan, if you have one. Most don’t cover routine cleanings, but they might include dental accidents or illnesses. Ask your vet about insurance products that offer the best dental benefits and if she thinks it’s a good investment.

Does food make a difference?

When it comes to what’s in your cat’s food, it’s not so much the consistency you should keep in mind, but the formula. While it’s ideal to keep your cat’s teeth tartar-free, the medical issue you should be aiming to prevent is the inflammation of the gums through gingivitis. One way to do this is to eliminate inflammatory ingredients like carbohydrates such as corn and brewer’s rice, whether your cat’s food is wet or dry.

Why? Cats are descended from lions. Have you ever seen a pride of lions stalking and hunting corn and tomatoes? According to a piece originally reported by Animal Wellness Magazine, carbs are not natural for cats. Instead, they recommend opting for grain-free foods that are high in moisture, including “high-quality canned, raw and freeze-dried diets.” (The FDA acknowledges that there is a suggested link between grain-free dog food and canine heart disease, but no such link appears to exist in cats.)

Should i brush my cat

If you wish to keep tartar off of your cat’s teeth, you can look to treats to assist you in between brushings. For a natural remedy, try offering your cat a raw, hard bone that won’t splinter, like beef, which will knock tartar off their teeth and stimulate their gums. If convenient treats are more your style, be sure to check your products for the VOHC (Veterinary Oral Health Council) label, which ensures that your cat is eating treats that have been tested for safety.

Should I brush my cat’s fur? Is this something you’ve been asking yourself for a while? Does your cat look a bit scruffy or are you just unsure whether this is something that needs doing, it’s not like it’s common to send them to a cat groomer like you would with a dog? So, should you be brushing your cat’s fur or not?

Well, the answer is yes, because when you spend time brushing your cat’s fur, it not only removes dust, dead skin, and loose hair, but it boosts their circulation and also provides a bonding experience for you and your furry friend as you get to spend quality time with them. This also gives you the time to have a look at their fur and their skin so that you can monitor their health and will always be aware if there is something different or wrong with it that you need to get checked out. It’ll probably be obvious if there is something off with your cat’s fur but the main things to be aware of are sore patches, wounds, or matted fur. Or if you notice the condition or look of your cat’s fur has changed then it might be a good idea to speak to your vet.

If your cat has long hair then they will likely need brushing every day to stop any tangling and matting whereas if your cat is short-haired then they should be fine with a brush once a week as they generally do a good job of grooming themselves. These grooming sessions don’t have to take a long time, but short and regular sessions will be best for your cat and you can use praise and treats to make sure that they associate this brushing with positive things. If your cat isn’t a fan of having their fur brushed and you notice that they are twitching, swishing their tail, growling, or hissing then you should stop.

It’s not uncommon for cats to get knots or matting in their fur and if this has happened to your cat then make sure you don’t grab the scissors and attempt to cut the fur because you could end up cutting your cat’s skin. If you do have knots to untangle then use a specialist de-matting comb or grooming mitt.

Generally speaking, to give your cat the best brush possible then it’s a good idea to use a metal, wide-toothed comb and comb the fur in the direction that it grows naturally. Don’t just stick to their back either, you should comb their chest as well as behind their ears, the back of their legs, and under their arms too as this is where tangles tend to form. If there are knots then just tease them gently.

There is a wide variety of combs and brushes available to buy for brushing your cat’s fur and while some are specifically for checking for fleas and eggs or to help with moulting. You can also get soft-bristle or pin brushes which help distribute your cat’s natural oils which is good for conditioning. Slicker brushes are good for pulling out dead hair and breaking down matting in long hair or you could go for a grooming mitt which is also good for removing the dead hair in short-haired cats.

Should i brush my cat

Should i brush my cat

Alina A. is a professional writer, editor, and pet-lover. She has published over 50 articles on how to care for pets properly. Alina has been writing articles for 3 years, so she has considerable experience in this niche. Her natural curiosity helps her to expand her knowledge and learn new pet care life hacks, which will make your life much easier.

Updated on: 07/26/2021

Especially for long-haired cats, brushing your cat is a crucial aspect of caring for them. It helps prevent matting in their fur that can cause issues with their skin and disrupt their comfort, but brushing also helps keep their coat healthy. Even if you have a short-haired cat, brushing them can cut down on the amount of hair your cat ingests during self-grooming. Questions arise about how brushing a cat can affect them and if you can overdo it. In this article, you’ll understand the ins and outs of cat brushing to ensure your kitty feels and looks their best.

Should i brush my cat

Is it right to Brush your Cat?

Most of the benefits of brushing your cat affect the health of their skin and coat. One of the most obvious ways that brushing your cat helps them is that, much like with people, it helps to avoid tangles and can stop them from turning into mats. Another way that brushing benefits your cat is through the distribution of the natural oils in their fur that helps to maintain it.

There are also other benefits to brushing your cat that doesn’t have to do it directly with your skin and coat. While cleaning, you can give your cat a thorough check for any skin abnormalities while also looking for ticks and fleas. Brushing your cat may also allow you to bond with it more efficiently while also helping your cat become used to being handled, an act that may help the cat’s vet visits go more smoothly.

If you neglect to brush your cat, you could end up with mats and tangles that can make it difficult for the cat to walk comfortably since it may pull on its delicate skin. Mats found around the sensitive armpits may even tear their skin. These mats not only cause direct issues to the skin but also block airflow and make it easier for fleas to find a place to hide.

How often should you Comb your Cat?

Should i brush my cat

Cats will groom themselves from time to time when they sense they need it, but you should step in to ensure they are as clean and well taken care of as possible. Then, there comes the question of just how often you should be grooming your cat. Really, it depends on the type of fur that your cat has. Long-haired cats will need to be groomed more frequently than other cats because more fur will become matted and tangled than short-haired cats.

Because cats don’t typically like to sit in one place and be handled for too long, you don’t want to turn to brush them into a half-hour ordeal. If you have a long-haired cat, brushing them for a few minutes daily will help keep their fur tidy and stop it from matting up. With short-haired cats, you can usually get away with brushing them for a few minutes twice or three times a week.

Can you over-groom a Cat?

While brushing a cat is crucial to their health, you mustn’t overdo it. If you clean your cat too frequently every day or for too long at a time, it could have adverse effects indeed. Too much brushing can make your cat’s skin feel more sensitive, but it can also lead to bald patches in the fur.

You will notice that you have been overbrushing and overgrooming your cat through various symptoms that they might display, such as constant scratching at their irritated skin. You may also notice that the cat’s skin issues extend to symptoms such as rashes, redness, and even sores that could occur from scratching sensitive skin. When it comes to the fur, you may notice that the hair does not have a healthy shine to it if you are overgrooming. Instead, it will look flat or even greasy in some places since the natural oils aren’t being distributed properly. When you touch the cat’s hair, it may not spring back in the way it should. Healthy hair starts with healthy skin, and if you have been irritating it with too much brushing, it could impede its growth.

Does brushing a Cat make it shed more?

Should i brush my cat

When you brush your cat, you likely notice that a lot of hair comes out and gets stuck to the brush. You might even have little piles of hair to clean up at the end of your brushing sessions, and because of all of the hair that comes loose, you might think you are going to cause the cat to shed more; but, that’s not the case. In fact, it is impossible to prevent your cat from shedding completely, but when you brush them, you can significantly reduce the amount of cat hair in the home.

As you brush your cat, you are actually reducing the chances of it shedding as much hair. This is because when you brush your cat, you are brushing free all of the loose hairs that would soon come loose and cover your furniture and clothes on their own. Brushing and grooming your cat regularly according to the needs presented by their hair type and length will go a long way toward reducing shedding.

While it is a good idea to take your cat to a groomer regularly to get them professionally groomed, While it is good to take your cat to a groomer regularly to get them professionally groomed, brushing a healthy, consistent amount will keep them comfortable in-between visits. Cleaning your cat benefits everything from your cat’s coat to your skin, and it can even help make them less anxious when being handled by people, including your vet. Keep the information covered in this article in mind the next time you break out a brush to groom your cat and make the experience of grooming more comfortable for both you and your kitty in the short and long terms.

ThePets is an informational website that features articles written by qualified veterinarians and professional writers. You can learn more about our editorial process. When selecting food for your pet, use Pet Food Finder, and search for the clinic to treat your pet using Vet Clinics Locator.

Keeping You Cat’s Teeth Clean With or Without Brushing

by Linda Hall, Cat Behavior Expert

Should i brush my cat

Lately we’ve been getting a lot of questions about cats and their teeth. Should you brush your cat’s teeth? Why and how often should I do this?

Why? Just like you and I, nasty stuff builds up on your cat’s teeth. The bacteria and plaque cause many issues including infections. These can be quite painful to Mr. Kitty and as we know, cats won’t complain when they are in pain. You might notice them eating less, especially with the hard food, but you often don’t know there’s a problem until it’s gotten bad. This can lead to infections that spread to other places and may require surgical removal of teeth. Let’s work on avoiding that!

Should i brush my catBuy how do you brush your cat’s teeth?

Google cat toothbrush and you will find a lot of products! There are two basic kinds of toothbrushes. There is one type that resembles the toothbrushes we use. There are also kitty toothbrushes that slip on the end of your finger which I think are easier to use. The toothpaste will usually be flavored with tuna or liver to make it more palatable for kitty. Never use human toothpaste . There is a lot of stuff in there that could make him sick.

These products are paw-some but how do you get kitty to cooperate?

It’s best to start when they are kittens. If you have a kitten, play (gently!) around their mouth to get them used to it. If your cat has learned to tolerate you touching his teeth, he will handle this a lot better! But what if you have an older cat?

Should i brush my catGive it a try and gently see if you can get near those teeth. Go slow and careful so kitty doesn’t get anxious. If you force it, anxiety will build up and your kitty will learn that coming near his mouth is a negative experience. Once your cat tolerates a little touch, see if you can touch the teeth or try for a bit longer. We have to work up to things with cats! I would hold off on buying that toothbrush until you know your cat will tolerate it.

What if my cat won’t let me near his teeth? Some of my kitties are more skittish and there is no way my hand is going to be allowed to touch those teeth. No worries! All is not lost! They make some a-meow-zing treats like Greenies that help get tartar off of teeth. There are also products you can put in the water that help reduce build up. Next stop is the vet!

Should i brush my catEven if you can brush your cat’s teeth thoroughly, they still need dental checkups with the vet. Hey! I brush my teeth every day but I still go to my regular dental appointments. Our fabulous felines are no different! By going regularly, the vet can identify issues and will clean those teeth a lot better than we can at home. I’ve seen many people who didn’t get regular dental checkups because … well … no one wants to spend money unless it’s necessary. I’m all about saving a buck but infections and surgical teeth removal are going to hurt my wallet a lot more than preventative care! I’m also saving my kitties from lots of pain and that is always high on my priority list!

Should i brush my catSpend some calm time with kitty and see if you think brushing those teeth is a possibility. If not, take a look into products that will help those teeth out and definitely make an appointment to visit the vet and get those teeth cleaned. Your kitty will be healthier and happier and that is the goal of every cat parent!

Dental health has been proven to affect overall health for cats. If you can see brown or yellow buildup on your cat’s teeth, then there are trillions of bacteria present on the surface of the teeth.

These bacteria cause dental pain and infection. This type of infection can go to other organs, creating abscesses, heart disease, and other serious issues. Dental disease is bad for your cat’s physical health and if his bad breath is obvious, it is affecting his emotional health too because you will not want him purring in your face. If you can see or smell the issue, it is advanced. We need to do something to stop it before it gets to this progressed state.

Should i brush my cat

Cats cannot brush their teeth so they do not have as many options to preserve dental health as humans do. Examine your cat’s mouth. If he resists you looking, it could be a sign of pain, so contact your vet for an anesthetized dental assessment and cleaning. Don’t be afraid of anesthesia for teeth cleaning. Dental pain is so bad that if you asked your cat, he would say that he wanted to address the problem and he would happily sleep through it!

Once your cat’s teeth are a clean slate, you can begin some at-home maintenance, including brushing. Brushing disrupts the bacterial growth and allows the normal cleaning mechanisms to clear them away. Start slowly, breaking the brushing down into tiny steps. Get a tooth brush for cats that is small and can fit over your index finger. When you have the toothbrush out, make sure that it is a happy and calm time for your cat. Rub canned cat food on the brush so that whenever your cat sees the brush, good thoughts occur. Don’t start with the goal of brushing all the cat’s teeth at one sitting.

Should i brush my cat

Baby steps are your friend. If you cannot safely brush the teeth, there are dental rinses and chews that might work better for your cat. Your veterinary staff can help you sort through what might work best for you and even do a demonstration of how to teach your cat to tolerate (and even like) tooth brushing. Doing something is always better than doing nothing!

We can all work together to make sure your pet is comfortable sand safe. Don’t underestimate the importance of dental care for your cat.

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Should i brush my cat

Some cat owners never brush their pets, but there are several reasons why this should be done regularly.

The number of times you should do this depends on how long their coat is:

  • Shorthaired cats – brush a minimum of once a week
  • Longhaired cats – brush at least one per day

You may find longhaired cats that regularly go outside need more grooming than those who are house cats. The same applies for shorthaired cats, although not as extensively.

There is clearly more work involved for owners with longhaired cat breeds, but the reasons why you should brush your cat are the same regardless.

Even though cats are known for being extensive groomers, they’re not perfect (sshh, don’t tell them!). Regular grooming on your part helps them – and you – in lots of ways.

1. It’s better for your home

Let’s begin with the fact that excess fur drops all over the place. Shedding is a real problem, giving you far more housework to do each day.

If you brush your cat when required, you’ll notice far less fur being shed around your home. (That’s got to be good for your vacuum cleaner too, even the best vacuum cleaners for cat hair can struggle on certain floors.)

Choose the best brush for the grooming session, so you can remove all the loose hair that is held inside the coat. After a few days or so, you’ll find there is far less cat hair being left on the sofa, on the bed, and anywhere else they like to go.

2. It’s great as a bonding exercise

Should i brush my cat

Most cats like being groomed. While cats in the same household are likely to groom each other, your cat will be happy for you to groom them too.

It provides a similar bonding experience they would have with another cat.

It doesn’t matter whether you have just one cat or several, you should still take the opportunity to groom your cat(s) to encourage the bonding experience.

Not only does your cat find this relaxing, it has been proven to be beneficial for human health too. You could call it a two-for-one bonus.

Better still, equipping yourself with a grooming glove from our list of the best cat grooming gloves will make regular brushing easier and more natural for you both.

3. It helps to prevent matted fur

This is far more likely to occur in longhaired cats, but even shorthaired cats aren’t immune to them. Once a knot occurs, it can easily get worse without attention. They are hard to spot in longhaired cats until they reach a stage where you cannot miss them.

Knots also tend to pull on the cat’s skin, making it uncomfortable and even painful for them.

Regular brushing helps prevent these knots from even getting started.

4. It helps identify any skin problems or fleas as early as possible

Fleas aren’t always easy to see until they are well established and causing a real problem. Regular brushing should enable you to spot even the occasional flea before it has a chance to take hold. Of course, regular vet-approved flea treatments should prevent this anyway, but brushing will help you spot any signs of an infestation as quickly as possible.

Watch out for flea dirt in their fur and on the comb or brush you are using.

If you have a dark-haired cat, you could always sit them on a white towel on your lap. That way, you won’t miss any flea dirt that might fall out.

Various skin conditions can also be spotted more easily during grooming sessions. As with humans, some cats are never bothered with these while others are. If you regularly brush your cat, you are likely to see the signs earlier than you might otherwise do.

Watch out for bald patches, sensitive patches, and other similar issues such as your cat not allowing you near a certain area. This could indicate injury or a skin condition that should be seen by your vet.

Spotting cat dandruff early is hugely important too – there are plenty of shampoo treatments for dandruff in cats, but for over the counter options, even the best shampoos for dandruff only work if you catch the condition early.

5. It helps your cat become more tolerant of other procedures

Not all cats like being handled by their owners, let alone by anyone else. If your cat becomes used to a grooming session with regular brushing, it is more likely to be more relaxed during other situations too.

You might someday need to use a cat nail clippers to trim out their claws, administer medicine, or to take them to the vet for treatment or examination. A perfect example of this is brushing cats’ teeth; even if you invest in the best cat toothpastes or dental gels, most cats absolutely hate the whole ordeal unless they’re already comfortable and trusting while being handled.

Brushing every day or every week means your cat will become more relaxed if they are not naturally happy with handling.

If this is the case, try a short session of brushing with some treats close at hand to start with. They’ll soon learn to associate the brushing session with something good.

Many cat owners believe their cats are fantastic at grooming themselves. Rightly so, too. Yet they are not perfect.

As a responsible cat owner, it makes sense to be certain your cat is happy and healthy and relaxed. Brushing them at the right intervals to suit their fur type is a huge part of this process.

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Should i brush my cat

As time goes on, I seem to learn more and more about my two cats, Tiny and Alfredo. For example, I know now that they can sometimes be moody and that it is totally normal when they groom each other. I have cracked the code and figured out that cardboard boxes will always be more loved than any store-bought toy and that they actually enjoy getting brushed. I have even found healthy and delicious food brands that they won’t get bored of after a few weeks. However, I was still confused as to whether or not I should be brushing their teeth — and if so, how? To help learn more about this, POPSUGAR spoke to two vets.

Do Cats Need to Have Their Teeth Brushed?

According to Michelle Lugones, DVM, veterinarian at Best Friends Animal Society, cat owners definitely should brush their cats’ teeth, and often. “Gum and teeth disease are very common in cats, so they should absolutely have their teeth brushed,” Dr. Lugones said. She pointed out that, just like humans, cats also develop plaque buildup, which can cause a host of issues. “The goal of teeth brushing is to remove the plaque before it forms into tartar,” Dr. Lugones said. “Brushing the teeth also keeps the gums healthy.”

Anthony Hall, DVM, MPH, expert veterinarian at Airvet, explained that keeping up with your furry friend’s dental hygiene is important not only for their dental health but also for their overall health. “Dental disease can lead to disease of other organs,” Dr. Hall said, “most notably the liver, kidneys, and heart, creating a slippery slope to major health problems and an overall decreased quality of life.” He explained that at-home oral care is a very easy way to keep your cat’s health in check and should be done three times per week at minimum, if not daily.

So How Do You Brush Your Cat’s Teeth?

Thankfully, there are some very simple ways to make sure your cat’s teeth are in tip-top shape. For example, Dr. Hall shared that you can use a small toothbrush (I currently have my eye on this one for my own cats!) to brush your cat’s teeth the same way you would brush your own. He also pointed out that dental wipes are a great alternative to a toothbrush. “You can also use special dental wipes that have a lightly abrasive surface that act in the same way,” Dr. Hall said. “Rub the wipe or brush over all surfaces of each tooth to keep them bright and shiny.”

Dr. Hall also noted, however, that it’s important to keep in mind that not every cat will allow you to brush their teeth. “For the feline that finds this activity particularly unpleasant, there are [active and passive] alternatives,” he reassured. “[For instance], there are gels, foams, and sprays that can be applied to the teeth that help to dissolve the plaque and create a more unfavorable environment for bacteria.” Dental treats and water additives are also a great way to help keep your cat’s pearly whites in check.

I was starting to get worried about her long fur because I noticed that it was matting a bit in a few areas. That’s one of the main reasons why it’s good to brush your cat. It’s important that cats get regular grooming mostly in the form of brushing.

Should i brush my cat
Honey Delite

  • Brushing prevents mats. As already mentioned above, this is one of the most important reasons why you should brush your cat on a regular basis. Mats can be very uncomfortable and even painful for cats. Sometimes, the only way to remove mats is by shaving them off. Nevertry to remove mats with scissors!
  • Reduces shedding. Brushing your cat helps reduce shedding some by removing excess fur. Instead of the cat shedding on your furniture, the fur is removed by a brush.
  • Helps keep your cat clean. Cats are pretty good about cleaning themselves but everyone needs a little help every now and then. Brushing can help to remove excess dirt and debris and keep your cat’s skin cleaner.
  • Brushing helps you bond with each other. Since most cats enjoy being brushed, this is a great time to bond with your feline friend. Some cats really enjoy the way it feels too.
  • Helps spread natural oils over your cat’s skin and coat. Brushing your cat will help spread the oils that their skin produces. These oils are responsible for keeping your cat’s coat shiny and free of irritants.
  • Brushing could help lessen hairballs. Some cats have problems with hairballs, especially ones with long fur. Regular brushing can help reduce hairballs in your cat.

A cat with long fur will need to be brushed more often than a cat with short fur. Long-haired cats should probably be brushed on a daily basis, while short-haired cats may only need to be brushed on a weekly basis. As far as bathing goes, it’s usually not necessary. If you’d like to know more about bathing your cat, I have written a post about it in the past that you can read – Does Your Cat Need a Bath?

Should i brush my cat
Photo via yoppy

35 comments:

I’m glad I’m not a kitty – I dislike this brushing-thingy :o)

We agree with Easy. Have a marvellous Monday.
Best wishes Molly

my nanny’s cat hates being brushed so she gets bribed with treats – oh to be a cat!

Maybe you can do the same thing Misaki? You are fluffy too 🙂

My kitties are mostly ok with being brushed. We do have a FURminator brush and they really are amazing at removing excess hair. And yes it is especially important to help with hair ball control. Now if only there was an easy way to get the kitties to agree to having their nails trimmed!

Ha – nail trims are a different story! 😉

Cody absolutely LOVES LOVES LOVES his Furminator. He will jump on top of his cat tower that is in our “office” and roll over waiting to be furminated. It is too cute!

Cody is such a sweetie 🙂

Love the Furminator! Dad uses the cats old one on me its great! Love Dolly

All except the last one are good reasons to brush your dog too.

I’d imagine that at least some cats appreciate the massaging feeling of being brushed. I’m glad you were able to gain the trust of Honey Delite. Hopefully brushing will be a wonderful time you two share together.

Very true Pamela! Thanks for stopping by – I hope I’m able to bond with Honey D. a little more too.

My old tomcat LOVED to be brushed. I’d brush, he’d squirm. I’d brush, he’d kick with his back legs. Was totally a game! I so miss him!

I love, love, love the brush, any time, any place!

Well that’s great Brian! I just read about your sister who doesn’t care for the brush too much hehe.

Bunnys need to be brushed too!I have to brush speedy daily as he shed so much espcialy now with hot weather!xx Rachel

Yep! That’s very true. I’ve met some bunnies who like to shed A LOT!

we all loves a grate brushin. we likez R kong zoom groom coz itz kinda like a brushin N cat maysage all at once .

I’m glad you kitties like your brushes! I don’t think I’ve ever seen one of those brushes before.

We will ask our friend if they comb their cats. I doubt it. Lots of Golden Woofs, Sugar

Reduced shedding is reason enough for me to brush Ru every day! He sheds like crazy! I should pass this post on to my mom, she has a cat that sheds a lot. 🙂

Jules of Canines & Couture
www.caninesandcouture.com

Aw I didn’t know you had a kitty!

I love love love my FURminator! When I won one, I thought it would give me another opportunity to bite the peeps. So far that hasn’t happened. FURminators are better than regular brushes because they get the undercoat, whichis very important. Regular brushing don’t. I used to jump on my Tree of Pain to be FURminated but now that they gave it away, there’s really no good spot to brush me.

On another note, TW used to have a stray angora living under her porch. Her fur got so matted, it actually peeled away from her skin. TW had been reluctant to do anything since the cat was supposed to belong to a neighbor but after that happened, she called her friend who worked for a shelter and they took the cat away. It was shaved and eventually adopted by someone who would take better care of her.

Oh awesome CK! I was worried maybe you wouldn’t like to be brushed. I’d love to try out one of those furminators on Honey D. Glad that kitty got to go live somewhere nicer. Mats are no fun =/

Should i brush my cat

In the interests of full disclosure, I’ll just say it at here at the beginning: I never have brushed any of my cats’ teeth. Not once.

I know I should; I council my clients that they should. But when I get the “you’ve got to be kidding me” look, I quickly offer alternatives that, while not as effective as tooth brushing, still do help maintain feline oral health.

I don’t dispute the facts showing that daily tooth brushing not only helps maintain the health of a cat’s teeth and gums, but can also prevent more widespread health problems down the line. My decision was purely practical, originating at a time when I lived with four cats, four dogs, and two horses. If I was going to brush all those teeth every day, I wasn’t going to get much else accomplished. And since brushing teeth less frequently than every other day or so doesn’t seem to have much benefit, I just decided to forgo it completely.

So if you brush your cat’s teeth every day, keep up the good work. I am impressed. For the rest of us slackers out here, here are a few of the other options that are worth considering.

    Regular dry foods don’t do much to keep a cat’s teeth clean, but some of the diets that have been specially formulated to help prevent dental disease do actually help. Look for a product that carries the Veterinary Oral Health Council (VOHC) seal of approval.

You do not need to feed one of these “dental diets” exclusively. You can offer a small handful of kibbles once or twice a day (decreasing your cat’s other food to compensate for the extra calories) and still get some benefit.

  • Drinking-water additives are extremely easy to use. Again, the VOHC seal of approval will let you know whether or not a particular product has undergone unbiased testing.
  • And finally, there is what I call tooth-wiping. Simply wrap one of your fingers in a piece of gauze (the rough texture is ideal), apply a small amount of a feline oral-care product to it, and run your finger once along your cat’s teeth on each side of the mouth. You’ll wipe away some of the plaque that is developing and put the active ingredients where they are needed most, from the back of the mouth up to the canine teeth. The whole procedure should take a total of about ten seconds … if your cat is cooperative, that is.

A lack of time (or desire) to brush your cats’ teeth isn’t an excuse to ignore their mouths, however. Do what you can preventative-wise, schedule a dental prophylaxis (exam, cleaning, X-rays, etc.) when one is needed, and if a problem like a broken tooth develops, deal with it quickly. Your cats may not thank you, but they’ll be healthier because of your efforts.

I was starting to get worried about her long fur because I noticed that it was matting a bit in a few areas. That’s one of the main reasons why it’s good to brush your cat. It’s important that cats get regular grooming mostly in the form of brushing.

Should i brush my cat
Honey Delite

  • Brushing prevents mats. As already mentioned above, this is one of the most important reasons why you should brush your cat on a regular basis. Mats can be very uncomfortable and even painful for cats. Sometimes, the only way to remove mats is by shaving them off. Nevertry to remove mats with scissors!
  • Reduces shedding. Brushing your cat helps reduce shedding some by removing excess fur. Instead of the cat shedding on your furniture, the fur is removed by a brush.
  • Helps keep your cat clean. Cats are pretty good about cleaning themselves but everyone needs a little help every now and then. Brushing can help to remove excess dirt and debris and keep your cat’s skin cleaner.
  • Brushing helps you bond with each other. Since most cats enjoy being brushed, this is a great time to bond with your feline friend. Some cats really enjoy the way it feels too.
  • Helps spread natural oils over your cat’s skin and coat. Brushing your cat will help spread the oils that their skin produces. These oils are responsible for keeping your cat’s coat shiny and free of irritants.
  • Brushing could help lessen hairballs. Some cats have problems with hairballs, especially ones with long fur. Regular brushing can help reduce hairballs in your cat.

A cat with long fur will need to be brushed more often than a cat with short fur. Long-haired cats should probably be brushed on a daily basis, while short-haired cats may only need to be brushed on a weekly basis. As far as bathing goes, it’s usually not necessary. If you’d like to know more about bathing your cat, I have written a post about it in the past that you can read – Does Your Cat Need a Bath?

Should i brush my cat
Photo via yoppy

35 comments:

I’m glad I’m not a kitty – I dislike this brushing-thingy :o)

We agree with Easy. Have a marvellous Monday.
Best wishes Molly

my nanny’s cat hates being brushed so she gets bribed with treats – oh to be a cat!

Maybe you can do the same thing Misaki? You are fluffy too 🙂

My kitties are mostly ok with being brushed. We do have a FURminator brush and they really are amazing at removing excess hair. And yes it is especially important to help with hair ball control. Now if only there was an easy way to get the kitties to agree to having their nails trimmed!

Ha – nail trims are a different story! 😉

Cody absolutely LOVES LOVES LOVES his Furminator. He will jump on top of his cat tower that is in our “office” and roll over waiting to be furminated. It is too cute!

Cody is such a sweetie 🙂

Love the Furminator! Dad uses the cats old one on me its great! Love Dolly

All except the last one are good reasons to brush your dog too.

I’d imagine that at least some cats appreciate the massaging feeling of being brushed. I’m glad you were able to gain the trust of Honey Delite. Hopefully brushing will be a wonderful time you two share together.

Very true Pamela! Thanks for stopping by – I hope I’m able to bond with Honey D. a little more too.

My old tomcat LOVED to be brushed. I’d brush, he’d squirm. I’d brush, he’d kick with his back legs. Was totally a game! I so miss him!

I love, love, love the brush, any time, any place!

Well that’s great Brian! I just read about your sister who doesn’t care for the brush too much hehe.

Bunnys need to be brushed too!I have to brush speedy daily as he shed so much espcialy now with hot weather!xx Rachel

Yep! That’s very true. I’ve met some bunnies who like to shed A LOT!

we all loves a grate brushin. we likez R kong zoom groom coz itz kinda like a brushin N cat maysage all at once .

I’m glad you kitties like your brushes! I don’t think I’ve ever seen one of those brushes before.

We will ask our friend if they comb their cats. I doubt it. Lots of Golden Woofs, Sugar

Reduced shedding is reason enough for me to brush Ru every day! He sheds like crazy! I should pass this post on to my mom, she has a cat that sheds a lot. 🙂

Jules of Canines & Couture
www.caninesandcouture.com

Aw I didn’t know you had a kitty!

I love love love my FURminator! When I won one, I thought it would give me another opportunity to bite the peeps. So far that hasn’t happened. FURminators are better than regular brushes because they get the undercoat, whichis very important. Regular brushing don’t. I used to jump on my Tree of Pain to be FURminated but now that they gave it away, there’s really no good spot to brush me.

On another note, TW used to have a stray angora living under her porch. Her fur got so matted, it actually peeled away from her skin. TW had been reluctant to do anything since the cat was supposed to belong to a neighbor but after that happened, she called her friend who worked for a shelter and they took the cat away. It was shaved and eventually adopted by someone who would take better care of her.

Oh awesome CK! I was worried maybe you wouldn’t like to be brushed. I’d love to try out one of those furminators on Honey D. Glad that kitty got to go live somewhere nicer. Mats are no fun =/

Should i brush my cat

Should i brush my cat

Natasha is a Clinical Director-turned-Group veterinary Advisor for IVC Evidensia.

She has significant experience in soft tissue surgery, including laparoscopic procedures.

Did you know that over 70% of cats develop gum disease by the age of 3?

When it comes to caring for your cat, it can be easy to overlook the importance of caring for their teeth.

Looking after your cat’s teeth can seem a bit daunting, so let’s take a look at the best way to look after your cat’s pearly whites.

Navigate this article:

Do I need to brush my cat’s teeth?

Brushing your cat’s teeth will lower the risk of them developing dental diseases and other mouth-related illnesses such as gingivitis, of which the most common cause is the build up of a plaque and bacteria.

Cats are masters of disguise, and when it comes to showing pain, they often hide their discomfort. Because they can’t tell us when they’re in discomfort, it’s important to keep on top of their dental hygiene. Cats require regular dental care to prevent the build-up of plaque.

How often should I brush my cat’s teeth?

Dental specialists’ advice that you should clean your pet’s teeth every day. To see any real benefit from brushing, you should brush their teeth at least every other day.

Brushing regularly has the same benefit for your cat as it has for you. It removes stubborn plaque and tartar and combats bad breath, which can come in handy after a tin of tuna. If plaque builds up in your cat’s mouth, it can become hardened plaque, which requires special equipment to remove.

If you notice your cat’s gums are bright red, or there is a lot of tartar build up on the teeth, please contact your vet for advice before attempting to brush your cat’s teeth. These symptoms could mean that dental disease may already be present, which can make brushing painful for your cat, and will require treatment.

Should i brush my cat

How do I brush my cat’s teeth?

Brushing your cat’s teeth can be quite tricky, as some cats may not allow you near their mouth. If possible, you should follow our simple 3 step guide.

Step 1: Use your finger to brush the side of your cat’s face, next to their mouth. Once your cat gets used to that feeling, progress to rubbing their actual teeth using your finger. Then you can introduce a small amount of animal toothpaste to your finger, gently rubbing it along the teeth.

Step 2: Now that your cat is used to having his teeth touched, introduce an actual toothbrush. You can get ones designed specifically for animal use to make things easier for you and your cat.

Step 3: Eventually, you should aim to spend around 2 minutes brushing all the surfaces in your cat’s mouth. Don’t worry if your cat doesn’t take to toothbrushing straight away; the more gradual the process, the easier it will be.

What toothpaste should I use to brush my cat’s teeth?

Healthy teeth make for happy pets and investing in high-quality toothpaste could stop you from forking out on big vets bills in the future. By keeping on top of your cat’s oral care, you can prevent the need for expensive tooth and gum treatments.

Visit our My Family Vets Shop to check out our AniDent range of vet-approved dental products. AniDent’s easy-to-use dental range has been designed to help you provide your pet with the very best oral care.

We recommend using AniDent Natural Defence Toothpaste, a tasty paste backed by science. It’s based on a special C.E.T. Dual Enzyme system that enhances the mouth’s natural defence mechanisms and quickly neutralises unpleasant odours by killing bad bacteria.

For best results, pair the toothpaste with the AniDent Dual Ended Toothbrush, a design that allows for surfaces to be easily brushed, specifically shaped to fit your pet’s mouth.

Need more advice on cleaning your cat’s teeth?

For expert advice on cleaning your cat’s teeth, get in touch with your local vet. Find your nearest vet using our Find a Vet page, or speak to a vet online using Online Vets.

Should i brush my cat

In the interests of full disclosure, I’ll just say it at here at the beginning: I never have brushed any of my cats’ teeth. Not once.

I know I should; I council my clients that they should. But when I get the “you’ve got to be kidding me” look, I quickly offer alternatives that, while not as effective as tooth brushing, still do help maintain feline oral health.

I don’t dispute the facts showing that daily tooth brushing not only helps maintain the health of a cat’s teeth and gums, but can also prevent more widespread health problems down the line. My decision was purely practical, originating at a time when I lived with four cats, four dogs, and two horses. If I was going to brush all those teeth every day, I wasn’t going to get much else accomplished. And since brushing teeth less frequently than every other day or so doesn’t seem to have much benefit, I just decided to forgo it completely.

So if you brush your cat’s teeth every day, keep up the good work. I am impressed. For the rest of us slackers out here, here are a few of the other options that are worth considering.

    Regular dry foods don’t do much to keep a cat’s teeth clean, but some of the diets that have been specially formulated to help prevent dental disease do actually help. Look for a product that carries the Veterinary Oral Health Council (VOHC) seal of approval.

You do not need to feed one of these “dental diets” exclusively. You can offer a small handful of kibbles once or twice a day (decreasing your cat’s other food to compensate for the extra calories) and still get some benefit.

  • Drinking-water additives are extremely easy to use. Again, the VOHC seal of approval will let you know whether or not a particular product has undergone unbiased testing.
  • And finally, there is what I call tooth-wiping. Simply wrap one of your fingers in a piece of gauze (the rough texture is ideal), apply a small amount of a feline oral-care product to it, and run your finger once along your cat’s teeth on each side of the mouth. You’ll wipe away some of the plaque that is developing and put the active ingredients where they are needed most, from the back of the mouth up to the canine teeth. The whole procedure should take a total of about ten seconds … if your cat is cooperative, that is.

A lack of time (or desire) to brush your cats’ teeth isn’t an excuse to ignore their mouths, however. Do what you can preventative-wise, schedule a dental prophylaxis (exam, cleaning, X-rays, etc.) when one is needed, and if a problem like a broken tooth develops, deal with it quickly. Your cats may not thank you, but they’ll be healthier because of your efforts.

Should i brush my cat

How often do you brush your cat? I know that in our home, brushing the kitties can be forgotten in the busyness of life and work. Some think that this is just a treat that their cats get from time to time, but regular grooming time is actually a very important part of taking care of our furry friends health.

Most cats loved to be brushed. Our orange tabby, Pooh Bear, would literally let us brush him for hours if we had the time.

Taking time out of your daily routine to brush your cat will benefit your cat in many ways, including:

  1. Increases the bond you have with your kitty. Simply put, your cats will love you more if you brush them regularly, and that’s worth a few moments of your day. Grooming increases trust with kitties and it can create an unbreakable bond between you and your cat.
  2. Stimulates blood circulation. Did you know that brushing your cat can help blood flow and even release toxins from the body? Try brushing your cat’s hair backwards with a flea comb and then forward again. A holistic vet taught us that!
  3. Reduces hairballs & shedding. When we help our cats groom with a brush, we’re removing excess hair from their bodies. This reduces the amount of work they have to do themselves, which decreases both shedding and hairballs.
  4. Helps older cats with joint pain. Brushing can often feel like a massage for kitties. Older cats may have a harder time grooming themselves due to joint pain, so regular brushes help assist them in this feat while also giving them a massage!
  5. Reduces stress. Brushing your cats on a routine basis is an euphoric event for them. Not only does the grooming session feel amazing to them, but studies show that routine also reduces stress in cats!

Different cats will appreciate different types of brushes. Find the one (or several) that your cats like and be sure to brush your cat at least several times per week!

Should i brush my cat

So you have a kitty and you don’t know what to use at home to maintain their coat. No worries! We got you covered. I’m going to go over what you can use to help maintain your kitties coat at home!

My favorite comb to use is the safari, you can purchase it on amazon. It’s a cheaper version of my professional comb I use on my salon kitties. Super comfortable to use with it’s a wooden handle to keep from hurting your wrists. The tight teeth help pull out dead coat without damaging their good fur. You can use this on a short or long hair kitty.

Zoom groom is a great option for short hair kitties. The only downside it is messy when you use it; it doesn’t have teeth so the hair comes off instantly unlike combs where you have to remove the hair from the teeth. Most cats love the zoom groom because it feels like a nice massage. You can use this for long hair cats but it will not remove or prevent mats from forming since it doesn’t go all the way down to the skin.

Now you are probably wondering why there isn’t a brush on my list of tools to use to brush my cat. I don’t use brushes on my salon cats for a few reasons. I find most cats get aggravated when using a brush because they don’t remove mats as swiftly like combs do. Most brushes don’t go down to the skin which is where the mats start, so they are not good for prevention either. If you do happen to find a brush long enough to go down to the skin, too much brushing can cause kitties sensitive skin to go raw (brush burn).

I would also caution against the furminator type combs. The teeth have blades at the end pulling and cutting the healthy hair. I have seen many cats come in with damaged hair and skin from a furminator type brush. If you are having problems with shedding I would instead recommend getting a de-shed treatment at our salon.

At my home I like to keep my comb next to my couch so when my kitty like to jump on my lap to cuddle, I can whip out my comb real quick to and she doesn’t mind. You may ask, what happens if you find a little tangle? If its small, smaller than a dime, no worries! Take your comb underneath the mat and in now swift motion, like ripping off a band-aid! Pull the mat out. If you pick it at it will cause the kitty pain and skin irritation. If you are having trouble removing mats please don’t hesitate to reach out. It it was I do for a living!

Do you have a cat? Are you concerned about the state of her teeth, or do you find yourself wondering how much teeth cleaning a cat really needs? Have you ever considered having her teeth cleaned professionally by the vet?

In this article, you’ll find out the most important reasons why you should consider having your cat’s teeth cleaned. You can use this information to help you decide whether this is right for you and your pet. Read on to find out more about the benefits of cat teeth cleaning.

Should i brush my cat

Teeth Cleaning Can Help Catch Problems Early

Just like humans, cats need the help of a professional to monitor their dental health and hygiene. When you have your cat’s teeth cleaned, the veterinarian can check for any signs that may indicate she is on her way to dental disease. The vet may also find signs of developing abscesses or other problems that can be handled before they get out of control.

One important preventative and diagnostic use of dental cleanings is to find oral cancer early. The sooner this type of cancer is detected in your cat, the better her chance at fighting it will be.

Teeth Cleaning Can Prevent Dental Disease

Although it may go without saying, having your cat’s teeth cleaned can help reduce the risk of dental disease, and may prevent it altogether. Regular dental cleanings ensure your cat’s oral health is as good as possible, including her teeth, gums, and even her jawbone.

If your cat already has some type of oral or dental disease, you may be able to stop its progression by having her teeth cleaned. Most types of dental disease cannot be reversed, but you can help your cat maintain the best oral health possible regardless.

Helps with Bad Breath

Many cats have bad breath, and their owners believe this is perfectly normal and just part of being a cat. Your cat’s breath should smell like the food she eats; this may not necessarily be a good smell, but it shouldn’t be a terrible smell either. If your cat has very foul-smelling breath, a teeth cleaning may be in order.

Bad breath in cats can be caused by other issues as well. For example, serious tooth decay or ulcers in the mouth may cause bad breath. Additionally, diabetes is known to cause bad breath in cats, so your cat will need to be checked by the vet to rule this out.

Teeth Cleaning Reduces the Risk of Heart Disease

One of the most important reasons to consider having your cat’s teeth cleaned now and then is the reduced risk of heart disease. Just like humans, cats have a greater risk of heart problems if they have poor dental hygiene. This is because the buildup of plaque on the teeth traps bacteria that eventually finds its way into the bloodstream. The more bacteria and plaque that builds up in the heart, the greater the risk of heart disease.

Cat teeth cleanings do not prevent heart disease entirely, but they can give your cat a very good chance at avoiding this type of illness later in her life. Talk to your vet for more information.

Should i brush my cat

It Helps Cats Keep Their Teeth Longer

Although some cats may be prone to losing their teeth when they get older for other reasons, most tooth loss in cats is due to a lack of dental hygiene throughout the cat’s life. By having your cat’s teeth cleaned regularly at the vet, you can help her keep her teeth longer and prevent her from losing any of them by the time she reaches her senior years.

Cats who have regular dental cleanings are much less likely to experience tooth loss, and they are also less likely to experience damage to their teeth. Teeth that are not regularly cleaned are not as strong as others, which means they become more brittle and may break much more easily too. You can help your cat keep her teeth strong and capable of eating her favorite kibble and treats throughout her life by making sure she has dental cleanings as often as she needs them.

Talk with a Vet About Cat Teeth Cleaning

As you can see, there are many reasons to consider having your cat’s teeth cleaned professionally by the vet, at least every now and then. If you have any concerns, questions, talk to your vet for more information. Your vet can provide any information you need to know about your cat’s dental health and wellness.

Call (870) 935 – 8387 or use the online form to talk with your Animal Medical Center vet about cleaning your cat’s teeth.

Should i brush my cat

Should i brush my cat

Natasha is a Clinical Director-turned-Group veterinary Advisor for IVC Evidensia.

She has significant experience in soft tissue surgery, including laparoscopic procedures.

Did you know that over 70% of cats develop gum disease by the age of 3?

When it comes to caring for your cat, it can be easy to overlook the importance of caring for their teeth.

Looking after your cat’s teeth can seem a bit daunting, so let’s take a look at the best way to look after your cat’s pearly whites.

Navigate this article:

Do I need to brush my cat’s teeth?

Brushing your cat’s teeth will lower the risk of them developing dental diseases and other mouth-related illnesses such as gingivitis, of which the most common cause is the build up of a plaque and bacteria.

Cats are masters of disguise, and when it comes to showing pain, they often hide their discomfort. Because they can’t tell us when they’re in discomfort, it’s important to keep on top of their dental hygiene. Cats require regular dental care to prevent the build-up of plaque.

How often should I brush my cat’s teeth?

Dental specialists’ advice that you should clean your pet’s teeth every day. To see any real benefit from brushing, you should brush their teeth at least every other day.

Brushing regularly has the same benefit for your cat as it has for you. It removes stubborn plaque and tartar and combats bad breath, which can come in handy after a tin of tuna. If plaque builds up in your cat’s mouth, it can become hardened plaque, which requires special equipment to remove.

If you notice your cat’s gums are bright red, or there is a lot of tartar build up on the teeth, please contact your vet for advice before attempting to brush your cat’s teeth. These symptoms could mean that dental disease may already be present, which can make brushing painful for your cat, and will require treatment.

Should i brush my cat

How do I brush my cat’s teeth?

Brushing your cat’s teeth can be quite tricky, as some cats may not allow you near their mouth. If possible, you should follow our simple 3 step guide.

Step 1: Use your finger to brush the side of your cat’s face, next to their mouth. Once your cat gets used to that feeling, progress to rubbing their actual teeth using your finger. Then you can introduce a small amount of animal toothpaste to your finger, gently rubbing it along the teeth.

Step 2: Now that your cat is used to having his teeth touched, introduce an actual toothbrush. You can get ones designed specifically for animal use to make things easier for you and your cat.

Step 3: Eventually, you should aim to spend around 2 minutes brushing all the surfaces in your cat’s mouth. Don’t worry if your cat doesn’t take to toothbrushing straight away; the more gradual the process, the easier it will be.

What toothpaste should I use to brush my cat’s teeth?

Healthy teeth make for happy pets and investing in high-quality toothpaste could stop you from forking out on big vets bills in the future. By keeping on top of your cat’s oral care, you can prevent the need for expensive tooth and gum treatments.

Visit our My Family Vets Shop to check out our AniDent range of vet-approved dental products. AniDent’s easy-to-use dental range has been designed to help you provide your pet with the very best oral care.

We recommend using AniDent Natural Defence Toothpaste, a tasty paste backed by science. It’s based on a special C.E.T. Dual Enzyme system that enhances the mouth’s natural defence mechanisms and quickly neutralises unpleasant odours by killing bad bacteria.

For best results, pair the toothpaste with the AniDent Dual Ended Toothbrush, a design that allows for surfaces to be easily brushed, specifically shaped to fit your pet’s mouth.

Need more advice on cleaning your cat’s teeth?

For expert advice on cleaning your cat’s teeth, get in touch with your local vet. Find your nearest vet using our Find a Vet page, or speak to a vet online using Online Vets.

Should i brush my cat

Dental treatments for companion animals are becoming more and more common. Marsha F. writes:

“ How important is it to brush my cats teeth?
”

Marsha, it can be very important. In the wild, cats rarely have issues because, on average, they only live for three to five years. Living in our homes, cats can live more than 20 years so there’s a greater likelihood of dental issues. Of course, just like humans, genetics play a major role. Some cats have a greater predisposition to problems than others.

Diet has a tremendous effect on dental health. The myth that dry food helps clean teeth is just that – a myth. In fact, dry food and treats can actually cause more problems than wet food (Think of how Cheetos get stuck in your own teeth). Cats who eat a raw diet tend to have much healthier teeth and gums because they’re getting better, more complete nutrition.

The big issue with brushing is whether or not your feline friend will tolerate it. If they’re trained early to accept your fingers along their gums, they’ll usually accept brushing. If they have difficulty with it, we suggest you begin by using a hair brush along the sides of their mouths since most cats really enjoy that. Once they’ve accepted the hair brush, introduce them to a plain toothbrush. I like the finger brushes as opposed to the long-handled brushes because you have better control.

You don’t have to use toothpaste, though brushing is more effective with it. Never use human toothpaste, though. Gently brush the outside of the teeth along the gum line where tartar is most likely to form. If your patient becomes restless, offer a treat and let them go on their way. You can always do a little bit at a time over several days. Whatever you do, don’t force it. You want your cat to associate brushing with positive feelings.

As to veterinary dental care, it’s important to talk to your vet about regular dental cleanings. Some dental problems, such as tooth resorption, are not always noticeable under casual examination. Your feline friend will need to be intubated and put under a general anesthetic for an effective cleaning to take place, so they have to be healthy enough to endure that. If a cat has a heart condition, general anesthetics can be dangerous. A veterinary cardiologist can use an echo cardiogram to make sure the risk presented by the anesthetic is low. As always, it’s up to you and your veterinarian to determine the best course of treatment for your cat.

For many of us, brushing, flossing, and visits to the dentist are a normal part of our regular hygiene routines, but what about our pets?

According to the American Veterinary Medical Association, the condition of your cat’s mouth can play a big part in his overall health and wellness and can lead to, or be the result of, additional health problems. That’s why routine check-ups are important and dental care between veterinary visits is essential, which includes brushing. Cats can’t come out and tell us when they have a toothache, so it’s up to us to be proactive about their dental health.

So, should you brush your cat’s teeth? According to the experts, all signs point to yes!

Should i brush my cat

Why should you brush your cat’s teeth?

To put it simply — you should brush your cat’s teeth because it keeps her healthy! According to Catster, periodontal disease is the most common oral health issue that cats face. This issue is caused by the gum disease gingivitis, which manifests when plaque sticks to the teeth’s surface, and can eventually reach the bony tissue underneath the gums. When left untreated, periodontal disease can lead to infection, abscesses, and even tooth reabsorption by the gums, all of which can be incredibly painful.

If you’ve noticed that your cat’s mouth seems sensitive lately, it’s highly recommended that you take her in for a visit with the veterinarian. Possible signs of periodontal disease include pawing at the mouth, drooling, bad breath, or only chewing his food on one side. Additionally, your cat may refuse dry food if the problem becomes too painful.

To keep your cat healthy and happy, always make his dental health a priority with regular brushing and dental check-ups with his doctor.

How to brush your cat’s teeth

Before you begin brushing your cat’s teeth, you’ll want to acclimate her to this strange, new routine — especially if she seems squeamish or fussy over having her mouth handled. Banfield Pet Hospital recommends building a pleasant routine to help her associate only good things with having her teeth cleaned at home.

Start by settling in one of her favorite spots, like a comfortable chair or a spot in the sun, and hold her in your lap so that she’s comfortable. Then, occasionally touch her mouth and lift her lips before you start brushing to show her there’s nothing to be scared of.

If she’s especially worried, you can try placing a bit of her favorite food or a little tuna water on her toothbrush or the tip of your finger to help her associate the brush with a positive association.

Should i brush my cat

Once it’s time to brush, apply a small amount of water or pet-safe toothpaste onto a cat toothbrush, which can be found at most pet stores. You can also make natural cat toothpaste at home. (Never use human toothpaste on animals, because the fluoride can make them sick!) If your pet absolutely won’t tolerate a brush, a small bit of gauze wrapped around your finger will work as well.

Next, open your cat’s mouth and gently brush the cheek-facing parts of his teeth, along with the molars and canines. (But don’t tell your cat she has teeth called “canines.”)

How often to brush your cat’s teeth

Ideally, your cat’s teeth are getting brushed every day. If that’s not practical or possible, however, any brushing is better than no brushing, so just do your best to brush them as often as you can. If her brushing is admittedly infrequent, be sure to disclose that information to your vet during her annual check-up, and definitely mention any changes you may have noticed in her health or behavior since her last visit.

How often should you have your cat’s teeth professionally cleaned?

Much like us, even the most diligent oral hygiene routine for your cat must be supplemented with a visit to the pros. The aforementioned Banfield Pet Hospital suggests scheduling a dental checkup for your cat once a year if possible, which can prevent or reduce the buildup of potentially harmful conditions like gingivitis or gum disease.

Should i brush my cat

Does the type of food your cat eats make a difference in their dental health?

When it comes to what’s in your cat’s food, it’s not so much the consistency you should keep in mind, but the formula. While it’s ideal to keep your cat’s teeth tartar-free, the medical issue you should be aiming to prevent is the inflammation of the gums through gingivitis. One way to do this is to eliminate inflammatory ingredients like carbohydrates such as corn and brewer’s rice, whether your cat’s food is wet or dry. Why? According to a piece originally reported by Animal Wellness Magazine, carbs are not natural for cats. Instead, they recommend opting for grain-free foods that are high in moisture, including “high-quality canned, raw and freeze-dried diets.”

If you wish to keep tartar off of your cat’s teeth, you can look to treats to assist you in between brushings. For a natural remedy, try offering your cat a raw, hard bone that won’t splinter, like beef, which will knock tartar off their teeth and stimulate their gums. If convenient treats are more your style, be sure to check your products for the VOHC (Veterinary Oral Health Council) label, which ensures that your cat is eating treats that have been tested for safety.

Should i brush my cat

How often do you brush your cat? I know that in our home, brushing the kitties can be forgotten in the busyness of life and work. Some think that this is just a treat that their cats get from time to time, but regular grooming time is actually a very important part of taking care of our furry friends health.

Most cats loved to be brushed. Our orange tabby, Pooh Bear, would literally let us brush him for hours if we had the time.

Taking time out of your daily routine to brush your cat will benefit your cat in many ways, including:

  1. Increases the bond you have with your kitty. Simply put, your cats will love you more if you brush them regularly, and that’s worth a few moments of your day. Grooming increases trust with kitties and it can create an unbreakable bond between you and your cat.
  2. Stimulates blood circulation. Did you know that brushing your cat can help blood flow and even release toxins from the body? Try brushing your cat’s hair backwards with a flea comb and then forward again. A holistic vet taught us that!
  3. Reduces hairballs & shedding. When we help our cats groom with a brush, we’re removing excess hair from their bodies. This reduces the amount of work they have to do themselves, which decreases both shedding and hairballs.
  4. Helps older cats with joint pain. Brushing can often feel like a massage for kitties. Older cats may have a harder time grooming themselves due to joint pain, so regular brushes help assist them in this feat while also giving them a massage!
  5. Reduces stress. Brushing your cats on a routine basis is an euphoric event for them. Not only does the grooming session feel amazing to them, but studies show that routine also reduces stress in cats!

Different cats will appreciate different types of brushes. Find the one (or several) that your cats like and be sure to brush your cat at least several times per week!

Should i brush my cat

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Should i brush my cat

The Spruce / Adrienne Legault

Cats have teeth that need care just like ours but most people don’t think about brushing their cat’s teeth like they do their own. Chewing food and toys provides some dental care but often times it isn’t enough to help prevent dental issues from developing. Knowing how to brush your cat’s teeth can help prevent these issues along with unnecessary pain.

How Many Teeth Do Cats Have?

Kittens will grow 26 baby teeth that will then fall out when their 30 adult teeth come in. These 30 teeth are usually in place by about six months of age and consist of four canines, twelve incisors, ten premolars, and four molars. The canine and incisor teeth may be the most noticeable teeth since they are in the front of the mouth but the premolars and molars do all of the chewing so they are the most important teeth.

Supplies Needed to Brush Your Cat’s Teeth

Preparing to brush your cat’s teeth will make the task easier. Some cats will require more of your patience or help sitting still while others don’t seem to mind getting their teeth brushed.

  • Finger Toothbrush: A small headed toothbrush, Q-tip, or another item can be used to brush the a cat’s teeth. Cats have small mouths and tiny teeth so a full sized toothbrush is usually too large to do what you need to do.
  • Pet Toothpaste: Toothpaste made for people not only has ingredients that can be toxic to a cat but the flavors are also not usually enticing to a feline palate. Toothpaste designed for cats will not only be safe for a cat to swallow but may help make the process more enjoyable if your cat likes the way it tastes.
  • Treats: Tasty treats such as cheese, tuna, canned cat food, shrimp or other smelly options are great rewards for a cat that isn’t used to or doesn’t enjoy having its teeth brushed.
  • Calming Help: Calming supplements, anxiety easing medications, sedatives, or relaxing pheromones can help ease the fear, stress, and anxiety that many cats have when it’s time to have their teeth brushed. These additives to your tooth brushing regimen can eliminate the fight that many people experience when attempting to restrain their cat.
  • Towel: A blanket or towel can be used to wrap your cat up when it’s time to brush its teeth. This wrapping technique helps a cat feel calm and secure and also keeps its paws from batting the toothbrush away.

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The Spruce / Adrienne Legault

Tips to Brush Your Cat’s Teeth

Once you have all the materials you need to brush your cat’s teeth you can actually clean your cat’s teeth. A friend may be beneficial if your cat is a little wiggly but if your cat is struggling and crying you should stop trying to restrain it. This is where supplements or drugs to calm it will be needed. If your cat isn’t struggling, wrapping it in a towel is still helpful to prevent accidental scratches and help provide an additional calming mechanism. Scruffing a cat is no longer recommended to restrain a cat as this actually increases their stress level.

If your cat is ready, provide it with some treats and then as you gently hold its head still, slide the toothbrush with toothpaste under the gums and brush the teeth. Once you get a few swipes of the toothbrush in offer your cat more treats and then continue brushing if necessary. Be sure to stop if your cat starts to struggle or cries.

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The Spruce / Adrienne Legault

What if You Don’t Brush Your Cat’s Teeth?

Just like other animals with teeth, if bacteria and food debris builds up on the teeth of a cat it can cause inflammation and infection in the mouth. This infection can then enter the blood stream through the blood supply in the gums and affect the internal organs of a cat. The liver, kidneys, and even the heart can be negatively affected by diseased teeth and gums.

In addition to the damage that dental disease can have on the organs of a cat, the teeth themselves can become so diseased and infected that they break, need to be extracted, or even fall out. Dental disease is painful, can cause serious health problems, bad breath, drooling, and permanently affect a cat if not addressed in a timely manner. By simply brushing your cat’s teeth you can help prevent these problems from occurring.

Should i brush my cat

So you have a kitty and you don’t know what to use at home to maintain their coat. No worries! We got you covered. I’m going to go over what you can use to help maintain your kitties coat at home!

My favorite comb to use is the safari, you can purchase it on amazon. It’s a cheaper version of my professional comb I use on my salon kitties. Super comfortable to use with it’s a wooden handle to keep from hurting your wrists. The tight teeth help pull out dead coat without damaging their good fur. You can use this on a short or long hair kitty.

Zoom groom is a great option for short hair kitties. The only downside it is messy when you use it; it doesn’t have teeth so the hair comes off instantly unlike combs where you have to remove the hair from the teeth. Most cats love the zoom groom because it feels like a nice massage. You can use this for long hair cats but it will not remove or prevent mats from forming since it doesn’t go all the way down to the skin.

Now you are probably wondering why there isn’t a brush on my list of tools to use to brush my cat. I don’t use brushes on my salon cats for a few reasons. I find most cats get aggravated when using a brush because they don’t remove mats as swiftly like combs do. Most brushes don’t go down to the skin which is where the mats start, so they are not good for prevention either. If you do happen to find a brush long enough to go down to the skin, too much brushing can cause kitties sensitive skin to go raw (brush burn).

I would also caution against the furminator type combs. The teeth have blades at the end pulling and cutting the healthy hair. I have seen many cats come in with damaged hair and skin from a furminator type brush. If you are having problems with shedding I would instead recommend getting a de-shed treatment at our salon.

At my home I like to keep my comb next to my couch so when my kitty like to jump on my lap to cuddle, I can whip out my comb real quick to and she doesn’t mind. You may ask, what happens if you find a little tangle? If its small, smaller than a dime, no worries! Take your comb underneath the mat and in now swift motion, like ripping off a band-aid! Pull the mat out. If you pick it at it will cause the kitty pain and skin irritation. If you are having trouble removing mats please don’t hesitate to reach out. It it was I do for a living!

Cats are natural groomers, but that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t do our part in keeping them clean and healthy. While cat coat and skin care basics are generally the same no matter the breed, certain types of coats require different kinds of brushes. While most brushes will work just fine, choosing the best one for your cat’s coat type will make sure they’re in tip-top shape.

#1 – Slicker Brush

Should i brush my cat

Slicker brushes are curved or slanted brushes with very thin teeth. They are ideal for medium- to long-coated cats and work well to remove dirt, dander and dead and loose hair. When used regularly they’ll prevent matting, but can also be used to help remove them.

#2 – Matbreakers

Should i brush my cat

Matbreakers are made for long-coated cats that need to have mats removed. They are long, slender brushes that have long blades instead of teeth. Matbreakers are used to remove mats without damaging the rest of the coat.

#3 – Dual-Sided Brush

Should i brush my cat

Dual-Sided brushes are ideal for short- to medium-length coats. They have a fine tooth brush on one side and a soft bristle brush on the other, removing tangles and spreading natural oils, respectively. They are very useful tools and both sides are equally beneficial when used together.

#4 – Mitt Brush

Should i brush my cat

Mitt brushes are rubber or vinyl gloves or mittens that go over your hand that have a toothed side to them that can be used to brush your cat. These brushes are unique in that they’re more like petting your cat than actually grooming them and your cat might not know the difference. They have short, soft teeth that remove dirt, dander and dead hair, leaving your cat’s coat sleek and smooth. They can be used on all coat types.

#5 – Shedding Comb

Should i brush my cat

Shedding combs come in different types, most notably the Poodle comb and Greyhound comb. The Poodle comb has thin teeth that are spread widely apart and are ideal for long-coated cats as they remove tangles and dead hair. Greyhound combs have teeth much closer together and can be used for all coat types but are ideal for short- to medium-lengths.

#6 – Shedding Blade

Shedding blades and rakes pull out dead hair, dirt and dander. They are ideal for all coat types and quickly freshen up the coat as they cover a large surface area of the body at one time.

#7 – FURminator®

Should i brush my cat

The FURminator® and similar brands are smaller, finer toothed shedding blades that remove both the top and undercoat. They are effective and getting rid of excess dirt and dander and can be used on all coat types.

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Für viele von uns sind Bürsten, Zahnseide und Besuche beim Zahnarzt ein normaler Bestandteil unserer regelmäßigen Hygieneroutinen, aber was ist mit unseren Haustieren?

Laut der American Veterinary Medical Association kann der Zustand der Katze eine wichtige Rolle für das allgemeine Wohlbefinden Ihrer Katze spielen und zu weiteren Gesundheitsproblemen führen. Aus diesem Grund sind Routineuntersuchungen wichtig und die zahnärztliche Versorgung zwischen Tierarztbesuchen ist wichtig, einschließlich Bürsten. Katzen können nicht herauskommen und uns sagen, wenn sie Zahnschmerzen haben. Es liegt also an uns, proaktiv mit ihrer Zahngesundheit umzugehen.

Sollten Sie also die Zähne Ihrer Katze putzen? Laut den Experten stehen alle Zeichen auf Ja!

Kredit: FatCamera / iStock / GettyImages

Warum sollten Sie die Zähne Ihrer Katze putzen?

Einfach gesagt: Sie sollten die Zähne Ihrer Katze putzen, weil sie sie gesund hält! Laut Catster ist Parodontitis das häufigste Problem der Mundgesundheit, mit dem Katzen konfrontiert sind. Dieses Problem wird durch die Zahnfleischerkrankung Gingivitis verursacht, die sich manifestiert, wenn Plaque an der Oberfläche der Zähne haften bleibt und schließlich das Knochengewebe unter dem Zahnfleisch erreichen kann. Ohne Behandlung kann Parodontitis zu Infektionen, Abszessen und sogar Zahnreabsorption durch das Zahnfleisch führen, die alle unglaublich schmerzhaft sein können.

Wenn Sie bemerkt haben, dass der Mund Ihrer Katze in letzter Zeit empfindlich wirkt, sollten Sie sie unbedingt zu einem Besuch beim Tierarzt bringen. Mögliche Anzeichen einer Parodontitis sind Pfoten am Mund, Sabbern, Mundgeruch oder nur einseitiges Kauen. Außerdem kann Ihre Katze Trockenfutter ablehnen, wenn das Problem zu schmerzhaft wird.

Um Ihre Katze gesund und glücklich zu halten, sollten Sie Ihre Zahngesundheit durch regelmäßiges Zähneputzen und zahnärztliche Untersuchungen immer vorrangig mit Ihrem Arzt behandeln lassen.

Wie putzen Sie die Zähne Ihrer Katze?

Bevor Sie mit dem Zähneputzen Ihrer Katze beginnen, sollten Sie sie an diese merkwürdige, neue Routine gewöhnen – vor allem, wenn sie zimperlich oder pingelig erscheint, wenn sie den Mund berührt. Das Banfield Pet Hospital empfiehlt, eine angenehme Routine aufzubauen, die ihr hilft, nur gute Dinge mit der Reinigung der Zähne zu Hause in Verbindung zu bringen.

Beginnen Sie, indem Sie sich an einem ihrer Lieblingsplätze niederlassen, wie einem bequemen Stuhl oder einem Platz in der Sonne, und halten Sie sie in Ihrem Schoß, damit sie sich wohl fühlt. Berühren Sie dann gelegentlich ihren Mund und heben Sie ihre Lippen an, bevor Sie mit dem Bürsten beginnen, um ihr zu zeigen, dass nichts zu fürchten ist.

Wenn sie besonders besorgt ist, können Sie versuchen, etwas von ihrer Lieblingsspeise oder etwas Thunfischwasser auf ihre Zahnbürste oder Ihre Fingerspitze zu setzen, um ihr zu helfen, die Bürste mit einer positiven Verbindung in Verbindung zu bringen.

Kredit: Inna Postnikova / iStock / GettyImages

Tragen Sie nach dem Putzen eine kleine Menge Wasser oder eine haustiersichere Zahnpasta auf eine Katzenzahnbürste auf, die in den meisten Zoohandlungen erhältlich ist. Sie können auch natürliche Katzenzahnpasta zu Hause herstellen. (Verwenden Sie niemals menschliche Zahnpasta bei Tieren, da das Fluorid sie krank machen kann!) Wenn Ihr Haustier eine Bürste absolut nicht verträgt, funktioniert auch ein wenig Gaze um Ihren Finger.

Öffnen Sie als Nächstes den Mund Ihrer Katze und putzen Sie sanft die Backenpartien sowie die Backenzähne und Eckzähne. (Aber sag deiner Katze nicht, dass sie Zähne hat, die “Eckzähne” genannt werden.)

Wie oft putzen Sie Ihre Katze?

Idealerweise werden die Zähne Ihrer Katze jeden Tag gebürstet. Wenn dies nicht praktikabel oder möglich ist, ist das Bürsten jedoch besser als das Nichtbürsten. Versuchen Sie es daher, so oft wie möglich zu bürsten. Wenn das Zähneputzen zugegebenermaßen selten ist, geben Sie diese Informationen bei Ihrem jährlichen Check-up an Ihren Tierarzt weiter und erwähnen Sie auf jeden Fall alle Veränderungen, die Sie an ihrem Gesundheitszustand oder Verhalten seit ihrem letzten Besuch bemerkt haben.

Wie oft sollten Sie die Zähne Ihrer Katze professionell reinigen lassen?

Wie bei uns muss auch die sorgfältigste Mundhygiene für Ihre Katze durch einen Besuch bei den Profis ergänzt werden. Das oben erwähnte Banfield Pet Hospital empfiehlt, wenn möglich, einmal im Jahr eine zahnärztliche Untersuchung für Ihre Katze durchzuführen, die die Entstehung potenziell schädlicher Erkrankungen wie Gingivitis oder Zahnfleischerkrankungen verhindern oder reduzieren kann.

Gutschrift: DjelicS / E + / GettyImages

Ist die Art der Nahrung, die Ihre Katze isst, ein Unterschied in der Zahngesundheit?

Wenn es um das Futter Ihrer Katze geht, ist es nicht so sehr die Konsistenz, die Sie beachten sollten, sondern die Formel. Obwohl es ideal ist, um die Zähne Ihrer Katze frei von Zahnstein zu halten, sollten Sie die Entzündung des Zahnfleisches durch Zahnfleischentzündung vorbeugen. Eine Möglichkeit, dies zu tun, besteht darin, entzündungshemmende Bestandteile wie Kohlenhydrate wie Mais und Bierreis zu eliminieren, unabhängig davon, ob das Futter Ihrer Katze nass oder trocken ist. Warum? Einem ursprünglich vom Animal Wellness Magazine berichteten Artikel zufolge sind Kohlenhydrate für Katzen nicht selbstverständlich. Stattdessen empfehlen sie, sich für kornfreie Lebensmittel zu entscheiden, die einen hohen Feuchtigkeitsgehalt aufweisen, darunter “hochwertige Dosen, rohe und gefriergetrocknete Diäten”.

Wenn Sie den Zahnstein von den Zähnen Ihrer Katze fernhalten möchten, können Sie sich mit Leckereien zwischen den Putzarbeiten umsehen. Als natürliches Heilmittel bieten Sie Ihrer Katze einen rohen, harten Knochen an, der nicht splittert wie Rindfleisch, der Zahnstein von den Zähnen stößt und das Zahnfleisch anregt. Wenn praktische Leckereien eher Ihrem Stil entsprechen, sollten Sie Ihre Produkte auf das VOHC-Label (Veterinary Oral Health Council) überprüfen, das sicherstellt, dass Ihre Katze Leckerbissen isst, die auf Sicherheit geprüft wurden.

Things Mr. Welch is No Longer Allowed to do in a RPG #1-2450 Reading Compilation Video.

Cats are natural groomers, but that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t do our part in keeping them clean and healthy. While cat coat and skin care basics are generally the same no matter the breed, certain types of coats require different kinds of brushes. While most brushes will work just fine, choosing the best one for your cat’s coat type will make sure they’re in tip-top shape.

#1 – Slicker Brush

Should i brush my cat

Slicker brushes are curved or slanted brushes with very thin teeth. They are ideal for medium- to long-coated cats and work well to remove dirt, dander and dead and loose hair. When used regularly they’ll prevent matting, but can also be used to help remove them.

#2 – Matbreakers

Should i brush my cat

Matbreakers are made for long-coated cats that need to have mats removed. They are long, slender brushes that have long blades instead of teeth. Matbreakers are used to remove mats without damaging the rest of the coat.

#3 – Dual-Sided Brush

Should i brush my cat

Dual-Sided brushes are ideal for short- to medium-length coats. They have a fine tooth brush on one side and a soft bristle brush on the other, removing tangles and spreading natural oils, respectively. They are very useful tools and both sides are equally beneficial when used together.

#4 – Mitt Brush

Should i brush my cat

Mitt brushes are rubber or vinyl gloves or mittens that go over your hand that have a toothed side to them that can be used to brush your cat. These brushes are unique in that they’re more like petting your cat than actually grooming them and your cat might not know the difference. They have short, soft teeth that remove dirt, dander and dead hair, leaving your cat’s coat sleek and smooth. They can be used on all coat types.

#5 – Shedding Comb

Should i brush my cat

Shedding combs come in different types, most notably the Poodle comb and Greyhound comb. The Poodle comb has thin teeth that are spread widely apart and are ideal for long-coated cats as they remove tangles and dead hair. Greyhound combs have teeth much closer together and can be used for all coat types but are ideal for short- to medium-lengths.

#6 – Shedding Blade

Shedding blades and rakes pull out dead hair, dirt and dander. They are ideal for all coat types and quickly freshen up the coat as they cover a large surface area of the body at one time.

#7 – FURminator®

Should i brush my cat

The FURminator® and similar brands are smaller, finer toothed shedding blades that remove both the top and undercoat. They are effective and getting rid of excess dirt and dander and can be used on all coat types.