Stupid geek tricks how to make mac os x get weird

Stupid geek tricks how to make mac os x get weird

Here’s a really stupid geek trick for you Mac users out there: You can make OS X lose its mind when minimizing a window with some quick timing and a terminal command.

This trick was first shown to me a few days ago by our very own Mac guru writer, Alex Layne, but I just finally got around to writing it up for the rest of you. Enjoy!

Make OS X Get Weird

The trick to getting this to work is to first open up a Terminal window, and then type in killall Dock, but don’t hit enter, and make sure to use a capital letter since this command is case sensitive.

Now flip over to another window, hold down the Shift key and click the minimize button. Note that this will only work if you have the Genie effect enabled for the Dock minimizing.

Stupid geek tricks how to make mac os x get weird

You’ll need to quickly Cmd+Tab back over to the Terminal window, and then hit the enter key. This will cause the window to stop minimizing halfway through.

Stupid geek tricks how to make mac os x get weird

The really crazy thing is that you can continue to interact with the window—even browse, or do anything that you’d normally do.

Stupid geek tricks how to make mac os x get weird

Put it Back to Normal

To put the window back to normal, switch over to it, and then use the Minimize command from the menu. The window will minimize like normal, and then you can restore it again.

Naturally, the best way to use this trick is when somebody else leaves their Mac unattended—they will think their computer went insane.

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I’ve deleted all the apps and big files I can, and I’m still left with barely enough storage space – a measly 14GB left, which surely can’t be right. I can’t explain it, but here:

My applications only take up 2.84GB, my documents only 358MB, and my mail only 835.5MB.

The biggest thing I have on this computer is only 2 GB. How on earth do I only have 14 GB left?

Any sort of help would be greatly appreciated, please tell me if I’ve done something wrong. Also, sorry if I put this in the wrong category.

Posted on Jan 28, 2020 8:48 AM

Nope, you’re good! I understand. It could be a number of issues. I’m not in your computer so I can’t see how you’ve utilized that space. It could be other users on your computer, it could be virtual machines that you’ve made. It could be cookies, and “system” are often times files that you can delete manually. Try going to your library from the option key trick I mentioned, and then look for application support folder. Mine takes up 3 gb, and it’s showing apps that I thought I already deleted, sooo going to that now xD If you just right click on a folder it will tell you how much space it’s taking up by clicking on “get info” and from that you can begin to determine what folders are fatties, and which are skinny on the kilo diet. Let me know if doing that doesn’t help. You definitely don’t need to buy extra storage, you need to push Apple for answers, because it’s a very very common issue. Also, try this. Go to your main screen, click on “go” then click “computer” click on “Macintosh hd” and THAT should show you all the stuff you’ve got.

Posted on Jan 28, 2020 2:47 PM

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Ah yes, the “system” taking up all your freaking gigs. I’ve had this issue before, and another way to see exactly what’s taking up all the space is when you click on the Apple, then About This Mac, and then Storage, you’ll see it change if you just wait for a few minutes. It takes some time to assess what is eating your computer alive. Once you can figure out what that is all about, just look for those files themselves in your hard disk. In your main screen, try holding the option key down, and click on go, which then pulls up the Library option. That should provide you more options to find out where those pesky files are. Apple really needs to change this. Let me know if you’re still having a problem!

Jan 28, 2020 12:03 PM

Hi: Use Disk Utility check on your total free storage, etc. Here is what I show.

Jan 28, 2020 12:24 PM

So I did that, did a bunch of useless calculations and found this:

The ”system” and ”other volumes in container” take a total of 102.51 GB. There’s nothing I can change about this as they’re both permanently implemented in my laptop. My MacBook has a total of 121.12 GB. That means 102 of the 121 GB in my computer has been taken up by the system. All that’s left is 18.61GB of free storage? I must be doing something very wrong because again.. That can’t be right.

My personal files and applications take a total of 4.81GB of the 18GB left now.

And now all that’s left is 13.72GB.. jeez.

Do all MacBooks really only have 18.61GB of free personal storage left? Sorry if this is so confusing, I’m not a computer geek or anything but I just wanna know where all my storage went.

Here’s this, if it makes it any easier to understand.

Am I going to have to buy extra storage? I shouldn’t have to buy a hard drive, I just edit videos as a hobby. I’m genuinely so confused, just a regular Mac user, no genius, so sorry if the answer is really simple because I have no clue.

Jan 28, 2020 2:29 PM

Nope, you’re good! I understand. It could be a number of issues. I’m not in your computer so I can’t see how you’ve utilized that space. It could be other users on your computer, it could be virtual machines that you’ve made. It could be cookies, and “system” are often times files that you can delete manually. Try going to your library from the option key trick I mentioned, and then look for application support folder. Mine takes up 3 gb, and it’s showing apps that I thought I already deleted, sooo going to that now xD If you just right click on a folder it will tell you how much space it’s taking up by clicking on “get info” and from that you can begin to determine what folders are fatties, and which are skinny on the kilo diet. Let me know if doing that doesn’t help. You definitely don’t need to buy extra storage, you need to push Apple for answers, because it’s a very very common issue. Also, try this. Go to your main screen, click on “go” then click “computer” click on “Macintosh hd” and THAT should show you all the stuff you’ve got.

Jan 28, 2020 2:47 PM

How do I know which ones I need and which ones I don’t? I think I might need some for After Effects, but I don’t know which ones are important and which ones I can trash.

Jan 28, 2020 2:51 PM

Don’t delete one’s that you don’t know about, that could cause you to have to take it into the store to have them factory reset. Don’t fear taking control of your computer, just look in those folders for potential videos that you’ve made and no longer use, or snippets or whatever, and just delete them manually. It should be simple enough to navigate once you start from the folder I told you about, because they branch out like a tree.

(PS I tried messaging you right away, but because Apple is a little club apparently that I’m not in, even though I have their products, I can’t message you right away when I see a response LOL. What a petty club to be in, I’m only lvl 1, so I am not special enough to help you yet. Terribly sorry)

EDIT: you can try to narrow it down by clicking on the first few folders it shows from the HD Macintosh part, and seeing which take up the most space. Click on that one, then see all the new folders it shows. Do the same “get info” on them and then follow that folder. When you keep digging, you’ll start to see folders that you potentially recognize and can delete. Hope that helps!

Jan 28, 2020 2:59 PM

Oh my God – Jesus Christ, thank you for this. I was stalking those files you told me to look at and I found a folder that contained more folders of incredibly old files of games that were over 25 GB – twenty five. Deleted them all, screamed, and got 37.05 GB now. That is so strange.. I didn’t know these folders were still here, them being years old.. Why didn’t it show up in the storage management ? Nevertheless, thank you. These demon folders were just hiding deep within my system’s library for years, sucking up all my storage. I’m so relieved I went and actually digged around.

Jan 28, 2020 3:00 PM

hahahahaha you’re welcome. I’m so happy to help, your reaction was priceless and now I have a dumb smile on my face. xD Just keep investigating, storage is a strange business 😛 Have a great day.

Your Mac is running a little slow these days. It takes forever to boot up. You have to delete something just to download that file attachment from Carla in accounting. Any time you stream a video it seems to lock up for a few seconds. Let’s fix all that.

Update Your System Software

Before we do anything, let’s make sure your Mac is up to date. Click the Apple icon > App Store, then click the Updates tab. Install any software updates you see here, including macOS updates. This might include security updates or small performance improvements for whatever version of macOS you’re running.

Of course, Apple’s operating systems have been free for the last several iterations, so if you want to also update to Mavericks , Yosemite , El Capitan , or Sierra , you can usually do so without any knock on your Mac’s performance. This is completely optional and up to you, but make sure you are at least running the most recent version of whichever operating system you’ve landed on.

Get Rid of Old Apps

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Generally speaking, cleaning up your Mac is often about deleting all the cruft you’ve accumulated over the years that causes your storage space to fill up. If you’re low on space or folders just feel too cluttered, it’s time to delete old junk. Personally, I like to start by removing apps and then move onto deleting files. It’s very easy to glance at a list and know whether you still use an app or not.

Open up your Applications folder, then sort the apps by size, with the largest at the top. If you have a huge application installed that you never use, like iMovie or Garageband, get rid of them. Remember, you can always download anything you got from the Mac App Store again. If you purchased software from a developer, make sure you still have the license key somewhere before you delete it, just in case you need it again at some point in the future.

We’re all trained to uninstall Mac apps by dragging an icon into the trash from the Applications folder, but doing so tends to leave random files associated with that app across your system. These orphan files are rarely substantial in size, but it’s clutter nonetheless. Instead, it’s best to use a utility that’ll also track down that orphaned files. I like App Cleaner for this because it’s free and easy to use. Click and drag an application you want to delete into the App Cleaner window, then App Cleaner hunts down and removes any files associated with that application.

Clear Out Your Storage Space

Chances are, once you clear out a bunch of dumb old apps you no longer use, you’ll have a lot more storage space. That’s not the end of the process though.If you’re working with small storage, you need to be more vigilant. Next up, it’s time to dig around for weird old files you no longer need.

If you’re running macOS Sierra, you can easily find and remove large files using the built-in storage manager . If you’re not on Sierra, I like the $10 hard drive analyzer, DaisyDisk . DaisyDisk analyzes your system, finds massive files, then lets you delete those files right from the app. Launch DaisyDisk and it shows you a graph with all your files based on type. This way, you can track down anything that’s suspiciously large, like some random video you needed one time, then delete it. DaisyDisk is idiot-proof and automatically hides system files. Since you can preview files in the app, it’s pretty hard to remove an important file on accident. Even still, before you do this, make sure you have backups of any important files.

Go through your very large files and delete anything you no longer need. Depending on how you tend to store files or if you have different backups, this might be a few downloads you forgot about, or it might be entire directories of files you no longer need. For example, as you can see in the GIF above, I can follow a trail of storage hogs all the way down to my email application’s hidden attachments folder.

If you don’t want to shell out the $10 for DaisyDisk and you’re not using macOS Sierra, Disk Inventory X is free and does the job as well, it just doesn’t look nearly as pretty as other options .

Renaming files in Finder without jumping away
Oct 08, ’10 07:30:00AM • Contributed by: HairyPotter

This is something that always annoyed me. You have Finder open and you are seeing a long list of files. Among these files, perhaps down in those beginning with an R, you see some files you want to rename.

Lets say you have 3 files to rename and all files are in sequence (alphabetical order). For example: ray01.jpg, ray02.jpg and ray03.jpg and you want to rename them to array01.jpg, array02.jpg and array03.jpg. You put the cursor over the first file, type enter and start renaming the file. As soon as you type enter to confirm the new name, you lose the other files from your sight. This because, as the renamed file now begins with A, you have find showing the files in alphabetical order and you have the renamed file selected, Finder will move the cursor to where the file belongs in the alphabetical list and you will have to go down the list again, and find ray2 and ray3.

The secret here is this: as soon as you press enter to confirm the name change, press the down arrow key to change the focus to the next file, in this case, ray2.jpg. The renamed file will move to its proper order and you will continue on the same spot on the list.

[crarko adds: I tested this, and it works as described. You do need to be very quick pressing the down arrow key or you miss the chance.]

  • Currently 3.67 / 5

Hint Options

Instead of pressing return/enter on the keyboard after entering the name you can just click on the next file to rename. However, I do prefer your solution because it avoids the while having to move a hand from the keyboard to the mouse/trackpad to get the job done.
g=

In the Finder Scripts folder, available from the Finder’s Script menu there are precompiled scripts that do this job.

I usually just take the easy route and leave the files sorted by Date in List View; then they don’t jump around at all when being renamed.

Of course, sorted by date may not put the multiple files you want to rename in close proximity to each other so you may still find yourself jumping around.

Well, second try here. first one was flagged as spam, I guess because it contained helpful links. So this time I’ll just tell you how to discover the links on your own.

If you only need to rename a few files and you do it fairly infrequently then the posted hint has some utility. However, if you frequently have to rename lots of files, a more utilitarian approach is with the unix command line.

My preferred method is with a perl script. If you Google “perl script rename multiple files with wildcards” you will find several fine examples of how to do this.

Alternatively, if you really want to impress your geek friends, Google this: “linux rename command on mac os x”. One of the first links will be to a hint on this very forum that will make your day.

This hint is useful, but you have to be very quick with the arrow key.

joeyblades suggestion of using a shell script if you have many renames to do is correct. Larry Wall’s classic ‘rename’ Perl script is one of the most time saving bits of code out there. I seem to remember 10.4 including an older version of file-rename, but it doesn’t appear to be in 10.6. But for times when you don’t need the power, knowing this hint makes Finder more useful.

If you don�t need to select the file before or after the renamed file you can also press escape�just as quickly as you�d press the cursor-up or cursor-down button.

This is a weeny li�l bit easier for me since my left hand knows better where to find escape than my right hand knows where the cursor keys are.

Or simply use NameChanger from MRR Software.

I renamed a thousand pictures in 45 minutes or so.

Awesome! This works great. Thank you!

(NameChanger from MRR Software.)

Try A Better Finder Rename – http://www.publicspace.net/ABetterFinderRename/

One of a set of 3 utilities that are all VERY useful.

in alphabetical list mode i click on the name — not the icon which won’t highlight the name — and rename the file. i hit tab or enter and QUICKLY hit the up or down arrow key. if i keep the keyboard busy the newly named files wait until half a dozen-ish are renamed, or i pause, before they move to their new spot if they need to. if you end up in the “a”‘s and want to get back to the “r”‘s, just type “r” to jump to the “r”‘s in the list.

Instead of all the workarounds, can we just bash Apple a little for this? 10.5/4/3. didn’t work this way. I often have to rename files that might be in a folder of a thousand files or more. This new (to me) jumping away crap is a PITA!

I’ll take this behavior over Windows ”Right-Click, Select ‘Refresh’ to have your changes occur” behavior any day.

Or, better, IMHO, I use a Spotlight query to group the files in need of renaming.

And I guess I must be getting old; seems to me Mac OS has always done the jump thing; I am so attuned to just knowing the name of the next file I want to rename that I simply let it jump then type those letters to get to the next target that I guess I thought this was the way it always had been.

We’ve always been at war with Instant Refresh.

What I miss is the elegance of using a leading Tilde to push files to the end of a list and a bullet to push it to the front. Spaces and Z’s look stupid.

Take a screenshot on a Kindle Paperwhite
Oct 18, ’12 07:30:00AM • Contributed by: kirkmc

Seen on Twitter: Scott McNulty shared how to take a screenshot on a Kindle Paperwhite.

“Tap the upper right corner and the lower left at the same time. Screen flashes, screenshot saved to the root.”

Scott should know; he owns more Kindles than anyone except Jeff Bezos.

  • Currently 2.53 / 5

Hint Options

Is this a Mac OS X hint? Did this get posted to the wrong forum or something?

It’s in the “Other hardware” category. There are people who might want to know how to do this.

We also post hints about iPhones and iPads.

Thanks for the tip. For one, I appreciate having an “Other Hardware” category.

Yay clutter. People also might have car radios that work with iPods. Can we expect hints about those, too?

I’m confused. This is MAC OS X Hints, right? Why the heck do we care about a tip for a Kindle? Wrong website, perhaps? What’s next? Tips on how to use Surface?

No, not Surface but the next hint could be about Linux. Stop being so grouchy everyone. Thanks for this hint.

It would be different if this were for the Kindle app on IOS, but its not. Its for something that has 100% no bearing on Mac or OS X. Rather than asking me to not be so grouchy, the moderator should ensure that hints are relevant to the site. Otherwise, there’s nothing to say there won’t be Surface or Nexus hints, etc.

I have to agree, kirk, please reconsider this policy. It is a mistake IMHO (and I am not grouchy just because I have a different opinion about something) to include a catch all “Other” basket because it weakens the value of the site, it does not enhance it. If it were related to the Apple eco-system at all it might be worth posting here. Poor choice. Lets just move on and avoid this in the future, please. The real value about this site is that it is Mac OS X (of which iOS is a subset) and lets me search only on geek info for that knowledge base, otherwise I might as well cast a much larger net and search using google or bing.

Should have posted “How to take a screenshot on a Kindle and transfer it to your OS X running Mac” =)

The “Other Hardware”category has been around for awhile, so that’s not an issue. A post about how to use a Logitech keyboard on a Mac would be an example of the type hint that would fit here.

The actual problem is two-fold, (a) the category has been used for hardware that is Apple-specific, but not a computer, like the AppleTV, which is really “Other Than Apple Computer Hardware”, and (b) this most recent posting has muddied things considerably by not even bothering to relate things to the Apple ecosystem.

You really need two areas of categorization, (1) Apple Hardware, and (2) Non-Apple Hardware, and even though you could stick posts about Kindles in section two, that should be avoided unless it somehow relates to their interaction with Apple products, as in the aforementioned Logitech example. Otherwise, you’re just damaging the Macworld and Mac OS X Hints brand.

I’m disappointed to see this non apple tip on macworld.com/macosxhints.com. If I wanted to search other hardware tips and ideas I could simply use google. I now have two questions for anyone/guru’s out there: is there a way to filter the results to only see apple tips, and second, does anyone know of alternative sites that do what this site used to.

This comment has nothing at all to do with OS X, iOS, Apple hardware or how other hardware interacts with any of these. It has no place at all on this site. Google “Kindle paperwhite screenshot” if you want to find out how to do that.

How can I vote zero stars? It seems like the lowest you can go is one star, and that is too high.

This is stupid! This is not an OS X Hint. iOS hints and tips are relative because iOS is relative and derived from OS X. Kindle is not!

I think I figured out why this was posted� they want us to realize that even the Kindle is knocking off Apple just like Samsung. “Tap the upper right corner and the lower left at the same time. Screen flashes, screenshot saved to the root.” Funny how similar that is to IOS devices where you hold the top button and home button for a second and the screen flashes. May not be the upper right and lower left corners, but the concept is strikingly similar albeit implemented a bit different. The screen flashing is a solid knock off though.

Everyone else using visual feedback methods to confirm some user-initiated action has been undertaken better back off right now. Bloomin’ rip-off merchants!

404 means the file is not found. If you have already uploaded the file then the name may be misspelled or it is in a different folder.

Other Possible Causes

You may get a 404 error for images because you have Hot Link Protection turned on and the domain is not on the list of authorized domains.

If you go to your temporary url (http://ip/

username/) and get this error, there maybe a problem with the rule set stored in an .htaccess file. You can try renaming that file to .htaccess-backup and refreshing the site to see if that resolves the issue.

It is also possible that you have inadvertently deleted your document root or the your account may need to be recreated. Either way, please contact your web host immediately.

Are you using WordPress? See the Section on 404 errors after clicking a link in WordPress.

How to find the correct spelling and folder

Missing or Broken Files

When you get a 404 error be sure to check the URL that you are attempting to use in your browser.This tells the server what resource it should attempt to request.

In this example the file must be in public_html/example/Example/

Notice that the CaSe is important in this example. On platforms that enforce case-sensitivity example and Example are not the same locations.

For addon domains, the file must be in public_html/addondomain.com/example/Example/ and the names are case-sensitive.

Broken Image

When you have a missing image on your site you may see a box on your page with with a red X where the image is missing. Right click on the X and choose Properties. The properties will tell you the path and file name that cannot be found.

This varies by browser, if you do not see a box on your page with a red X try right clicking on the page, then select View Page Info, and goto the Media Tab.

In this example the image file must be in public_html/cgi-sys/images/

Notice that the CaSe is important in this example. On platforms that enforce case-sensitivity PNG and png are not the same locations.

404 Errors After Clicking WordPress Links

When working with WordPress, 404 Page Not Found errors can often occur when a new theme has been activated or when the rewrite rules in the .htaccess file have been altered.

When you encounter a 404 error in WordPress, you have two options for correcting it.

Option 1: Correct the Permalinks

  1. Log in to WordPress.
  2. From the left-hand navigation menu in WordPress, click Settings > Permalinks (Note the current setting. If you are using a custom structure, copy or save the custom structure somewhere.)
  3. Select Default.
  4. Click Save Settings.
  5. Change the settings back to the previous configuration (before you selected Default). Put the custom structure back if you had one.
  6. Click Save Settings.

This will reset the permalinks and fix the issue in many cases. If this doesn’t work, you may need to edit your .htaccess file directly.

Option 2: Modify the .htaccess File

Add the following snippet of code to the top of your .htaccess file:

# BEGIN WordPress

RewriteEngine On
RewriteBase /
RewriteRule ^index.php$ – [L]
RewriteCond % !-f
RewriteCond % !-d
RewriteRule . /index.php [L]

# End WordPress

If your blog is showing the wrong domain name in links, redirecting to another site, or is missing images and style, these are all usually related to the same problem: you have the wrong domain name configured in your WordPress blog.

How to modify your .htaccess file

The .htaccess file contains directives (instructions) that tell the server how to behave in certain scenarios and directly affect how your website functions.

Redirects and rewriting URLs are two very common directives found in a .htaccess file, and many scripts such as WordPress, Drupal, Joomla and Magento add directives to the .htaccess so those scripts can function.

It is possible that you may need to edit the .htaccess file at some point, for various reasons.This section covers how to edit the file in cPanel, but not what may need to be changed.(You may need to consult other articles and resources for that information.)

There are Many Ways to Edit a .htaccess File

  • Edit the file on your computer and upload it to the server via FTP
  • Use an FTP program’s Edit Mode
  • Use SSH and a text editor
  • Use the File Manager in cPanel

The easiest way to edit a .htaccess file for most people is through the File Manager in cPanel.

How to Edit .htaccess files in cPanel’s File Manager

Before you do anything, it is suggested that you backup your website so that you can revert back to a previous version if something goes wrong.

Stupid geek tricks how to make mac os x get weird

Apple continues simplifying our System Preferences options in macOS, seemingly removing features we were accustomed to. One of those is the Detect Displays button, which appears missing from macOS Sierra 10.12. It turns out that option is still there, and many others, with a simple keystroke.

Stupid geek tricks how to make mac os x get weird

The Display Preferences in macOS have more options than you might realize (Image Credit: Unsplash)

Modifier Keys Are Nothing New to macOS

It’s not unusual for modifier keys to open up new options in OS X and macOS. That’s typically how Apple “hides” things the developers and engineers think non-power users shouldn’t have access to. We’ve learned quite a few of these hidden options, though.

Press the Option key before you click the Volume icon, and you can see both your output and input devices. Holding the same key before clicking the Wi-Fi icon gives you lots of details about your wireless network. And, of course, pressing the option key from Finder’s Go menu shows some hidden folders.

Using the Option Key in Display Preferences

There are a couple of things the Option key does in Display Preferences. For reference, here’s what Display Preferences looks like on my Mac Mini, before I press the Option key.

Stupid geek tricks how to make mac os x get weird

The default Display Preference options in macOS Sierra

If you press the Option with the Display Preferences window active, you’ll see the Detect Displays button show up. This is nice if your Mac has somehow “lost” one of your attached monitors or projectors, and I’m not really sure why Apple hid it this way.

Stupid geek tricks how to make mac os x get weird

When you press Option, you’ll see the Detect Displays button appear

Another feature you can take advantage of lies in setting the resolution for your display. With the Scaled option selected, you’ll see quite a few native resolutions for your monitor and graphics chip. However, if you press the Option key as you click the Scaled radio button, you’ll see even more resolutions for you to pick from.

Stupid geek tricks how to make mac os x get weird

Additional resolutions, like 1920×2160, appear when I Option-Click Scaled

Good Options for Advanced Users

The Option key combination provides great choices for advanced users. This is as true in Display Preferences as anywhere else. Just be careful with the resolution choices, as some of them might not be native to your display or Mac. That means they might not work out for you, even though they’re listed.

Stupid geek tricks how to make mac os x get weird

Here’s a really stupid geek trick for you Mac users out there: You can make OS X lose its mind when minimizing a window with some quick timing and a terminal command.

This trick was first shown to me a few days ago by our very own Mac guru writer, Alex Layne, but I just finally got around to writing it up for the rest of you. Enjoy!

Make OS X Get Weird

The trick to getting this to work is to first open up a Terminal window, and then type in killall Dock, but don’t hit enter, and make sure to use a capital letter since this command is case sensitive.

Now flip over to another window, hold down the Shift key and click the minimize button. Note that this will only work if you have the Genie effect enabled for the Dock minimizing.

Stupid geek tricks how to make mac os x get weird

You’ll need to quickly Cmd+Tab back over to the Terminal window, and then hit the enter key. This will cause the window to stop minimizing halfway through.

Stupid geek tricks how to make mac os x get weird

The really crazy thing is that you can continue to interact with the window—even browse, or do anything that you’d normally do.

Stupid geek tricks how to make mac os x get weird

Put it Back to Normal

To put the window back to normal, switch over to it, and then use the Minimize command from the menu. The window will minimize like normal, and then you can restore it again.

Naturally, the best way to use this trick is when somebody else leaves their Mac unattended—they will think their computer went insane.

AVG still has no plans to release a security product for Apple’s OS X, despite first touting the idea more than a year ago.

Liam Tung is a full-time freelance technology journalist who writes for several Australian publications.

AVG still has no plans to release a security product for Apple’s OS X, despite first touting the idea more than a year ago.

In late 2006 AVG’s chief strategist, Larry Bridwell, told ZDNet.com.au that the company was looking at porting its antivirus application to Mac OS X.

“We are in the process of looking at that and seeing what the benefits of that are — especially since we have done the [Linux] BSD version, which makes it a little bit easier to port to the Mac,” said Bridwell at the time.

AVG’s chief technology officer Karel Obluk said the threat to Macs is still not enough to make a release worthwhile.

“As you would know there aren’t that many viruses for Mac. We would like to make a release at the perfect time or of a perfect product. So it’s still in the lab, but we would like to bring to the market a product that is useful for end user when they are ready,” he said.

However, Obluk did not rule out a Mac antivirus product some time in the future.

“We are working on something for Mac OS but at this time, we have no specific plans for a release or anything that we would disclose,” Obluk told ZDNet.com.au.

AVG last week announced the release of AVG 8.0 for Windows users, which includes technology it acquired through Exploitation Prevention Labs to give its product the ability to protect against malicious code delivered via compromised Web sites.

Strange as it may sound, the computer virus is something of an Information Age marvel. On one hand, viruses show us how vulnerable we are — a properly engineered virus can have a devastating effect, disrupting productivity and doing billions of dollars in damages. On the other hand, they show us how sophisticated and interconnected human beings have become.

For example, experts estimate that the Mydoom worm infected approximately a quarter-million computers in a single day in January 2004. Back in March 1999, the Melissa virus was so powerful that it forced Microsoft and a number of other very large companies to completely turn off their e-mail systems until the virus could be contained. The ILOVEYOU virus in 2000 had a similarly devastating effect. In January 2007, a worm called Storm appeared — by October, experts believed up to 50 million computers were infected. That’s pretty impressive when you consider that many viruses are incredibly simple.

When you listen to the news, you hear about many different forms of electronic infection. The most common are:

  • Viruses: A virus is a small piece of software that piggybacks on real programs. For example, a virus might attach itself to a program such as a spreadsheet program. Each time the spreadsheet program runs, the virus runs, too, and it has the chance to reproduce (by attaching to other programs) or wreak havoc.
  • E-mail viruses: An e-mail virus travels as an attachment to e-mail messages, and usually replicates itself by automatically mailing itself to dozens of people in the victim’s e-mail address book. Some e-mail viruses don’t even require a double-click — they launch when you view the infected message in the preview pane of your e-mail software [source: Johnson].
  • Trojan horses: A Trojan horse is simply a computer program. The program claims to do one thing (it may claim to be a game) but instead does damage when you run it (it may erase your hard disk). Trojan horses have no way to replicate automatically.
  • Worms: A worm is a small piece of software that uses computer networks and security holes to replicate itself. A copy of the worm scans the network for another machine that has a specific security hole. It copies itself to the new machine using the security hole, and then starts replicating from there, as well.

In this article, we will discuss viruses — from “traditional” viruses to e-mail viruses and exploits that could target your mobile phone — so that you can learn how they work and understand how to protect yourself.

Computer viruses are called viruses because they share some of the traits of biological viruses. A computer virus passes from computer to computer like a biological virus passes from person to person.

Unlike a cell, a virus has no way to reproduce by itself. Instead, a biological virus must inject its DNA into a cell. The viral DNA then uses the cell’s existing machinery to reproduce itself. In some cases, the cell fills with new viral particles until it bursts, releasing the virus. In other cases, the new virus particles bud off the cell one at a time, and the cell remains alive.

Similar to the way a biological virus must hitch a ride on a cell, a computer virus must piggyback on top of some other program or document in order to launch. Once a computer virus is running, it can infect other programs or documents. Obviously, the analogy between computer and biological viruses stretches things a bit, but there are enough similarities that the name sticks.

People write computer viruses. A person has to write the code, test it to make sure it spreads properly and then release it. A person also designs the virus’s attack phase, whether it’s a silly message or the destruction of a hard disk. Why do they do it?

There are at least four reasons. The first is the same psychology that drives vandals and arsonists. Why would someone want to break a window on someone’s car, paint signs on buildings or burn down a beautiful forest? For some people, that seems to be a thrill. If that sort of person knows computer programming, then he or she may funnel energy into the creation of destructive viruses.

The second reason has to do with the thrill of watching things blow up. Some people have a fascination with things like explosions and car wrecks. When you were growing up, there might have been a kid in your neighborhood who learned how to make gunpowder. And that kid probably built bigger and bigger bombs until he either got bored or did some serious damage to himself. Creating a virus is a little like that — it creates a virtual bomb inside a computer, and the more computers that get infected, the more “fun” the explosion.

The third reason involves bragging rights. Sort of like Mount Everest — the mountain is there, so someone is compelled to climb it. If you are a certain type of programmer who sees a security hole that could be exploited, you might simply be compelled to exploit the hole yourself before someone else beats you to it.

And then there’s cold, hard cash. Viruses can trick you into buying fake software, steal your personal information and use it to get to your money, or be sold on the digital equivalent of the black market. Powerful viruses are valuable — and potentially lucrative — tools.

Of course, most virus creators seem to miss the point that they cause real damage to real people with their creations. Destroying everything on a person’s hard disk is real damage. Forcing a large company to waste thousands of hours cleaning up after a virus attack is real damage. Even a silly message is real damage because someone has to waste time getting rid of it. For this reason, the legal system continues to develop more rigorous penalties for people who create viruses.

On the second Tuesday of every month, Microsoft releases a list of known vulnerabilities in the Windows operating system. The company issues patches for those security holes at the same time, which is why the day is known as Patch Tuesday. Viruses written and launched on Patch Tuesday to hit unpatched systems are known as “zero-day” attacks. Thankfully, the major anti-virus vendors work with Microsoft to identify holes ahead of time, so if you keep your software up to date and patch your system promptly, you shouldn’t have to worry about zero-day problems.

Remember the 80’s? (Too young?)

One of my 80’s favorites was the movie WarGames.

(Hint: You should really watch it on Netflix – it’s a classic.
Here’s the WarGames movie trailer for you kids.)

Anyway, for those of you who DO remember War Games, that speech synthesizer was pretty creepy back in the day.
But it was equally cool because speech was pretty rare in those days unless you had a Texas Instruments TI-99/4A (which I did – woot!)

It’s hard to believe that movie came out 30 years ago, and technology has changed a lot. Windows has had speech built in for quite some time, but did you know you can access the speech API with PowerShell?

Who cares, right? WRONG! It’s pretty fun! And it’s a good bit of code to use to prank your IT co-workers. (Think login script or batch file that runs as a scheduled task…)

Egypt Slots is one of the most popular online games, that is gaining a lot of popularity because of the amazing prizes that gives to the winners.

Here is a video demo of Windows Server 2012 reading classic computer lines from the movie WarGames:

Not too shabby for a Windows Server, eh?

So, shall we play a game? Visit 카지노 사이트 to check all the options that you have available.

Below is the PowerShell code for you to play with and tweak.
Have fun annoying people!

I have a MacBook Pro and two Thunderbolt displays at work. I work with the MacBook lid-closed because it’s overkill and I don’t have enough desk space anyway.

Every morning I show up to work and plug in a Thunderbolt cable and power cord, but my primary screen (the one in front) and secondary (one off to the side) are swapped. I have to this stupid song and dance in the Displays / Arrangement system preference and it’s getting annoying:

Stupid geek tricks how to make mac os x get weird

Is there a way to do this automatically? With a setting? An AppleScript? Is there a reason that the screens are always flipped?

Stupid geek tricks how to make mac os x get weird

5 Answers 5

Update: I think I got it.

There’s a utility called cscreen which lets you control the display settings. Running it shows all displays:

Sure enough, you can force one of them to be primary (with menu bar):

You can script setting the second screen as the primary like this:

Now, to bind to a key, I first created an AppleScript script, SwapScreen.scpt:

Stupid geek tricks how to make mac os x get weird

Then I used QuickSilver to bind the script to a F13:

Stupid geek tricks how to make mac os x get weird

Now, when I plug in my MacBook, if the screens are messed up, I simply hit F13. Sweet!

Stupid geek tricks how to make mac os x get weird

Been there, done that, with Mac Pro and 4 monitors. ;0

There is an odd bug/feature in OSX that makes default display settings privileged. This behavior has not changed with 10.9 and I believe is what is causing your problem. It is very poorly-documented and discussed on the web.

A permanent solution:

Log on as the root user (you will have to temporarily enable it).

Set the Display arrangement to what you want (as you show above)

Log back on as whatever you like

It is somewhat non-obvious how to enable the Root User for interactive login, though not hard. Here is the official Apple guide:

I would disable it when done for security reasons.

Stupid geek tricks how to make mac os x get weird

It should remember the external setttings.

Did you try to swap the cables behind the monitor in order to invert the connection order? Maybe could do the trick.

A very easy solution is waiting one months and upgrade to OS X Mavericks, where you will have the possibility of having the menu bar and dock on both screen

Stupid geek tricks how to make mac os x get weird

The tool I wrote, displayplacer, allows you to configure the “white bar” main display via scripts/hotkeys.

Configure your screens how you like, drag the “white bar” to your primary screen in the macOS system settings, and then execute displayplacer list . It will output the command to run to put your screens in their current configuration. The screen with origin:(0,0) is the main display with the “white bar”. Run this terminal command through a script, Automator, BetterTouchTool, etc.

Example profile 1 puts the white bar on the menu bar on the left monitor. displayplacer “id: res:1920×1080 scaling:on origin:(0,0) degree:0″ “id: res:1920×1080 scaling:on origin:(1920,0) degree:0″

Example profile 1 puts the white bar on the menu bar on the right monitor. displayplacer “id: res:1920×1080 scaling:on origin:(1920,0) degree:0″ “id: res:1920×1080 scaling:on origin:(0,0) degree:0″

Also available via Homebrew brew tap jakehilborn/jakehilborn && brew install displayplacer

MOTUNATION (formerly UnicorNation) is an independent community for discussing MOTU audio hardware and software. It is not affiliated with MOTU.

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DP 5.1 UB Reports

Post by toodamnhip » Sun Aug 06, 2006 7:17 pm

bone.china wrote: the way i see it is if MIDI doesn’t work properly in the first place, then there is no reason to buy any of motu’s or anybody else’s MIDI hardware. the MIDI problems are present on every platform on mac os x. i sold my mtpav and started using the MIDI port on my sound card and it’s the same old story as when i was using the mtpav. at least i got some of my money back. until the MIDI implementation is satisfactorily repaired on os x then the best advice is to use the cheapest MIDI interface that meets one’s needs because you are only going to waste time and more money in the long run working with a MIDI system that is woefully inadequate.

does anybody even know it pc users have these kinds of problems under xp?

Geez, bone.china, don’t assume that everyone is having these problems. I’ve had a few problems with MIDI-related things over the years since DP 4.0, and believe me, I get very upset when my MIDI workflow gets interrupted for any stupid reason. But these problems have never lasted for more than one version, and currently everything is running very well. I did a study a while back and found that MOST people with MIDI problems were using MIDI driver version 1.3.2. The fix for that was simply to go back to driver 1.3.1.

You might try it. I can’t guarantee it will fix what ails you, but a LOT of people have told me that it did just that.

Yeah Shooshie..maybe so, but what kind of company requires it’s users to de-bug and then recommend going back to older versions? What kind of co. makes newer versions of drivers that suck.

You should not have to do that, and the guy you’re arguing with, well, his point is that MOTU is not getting the job done well, and I think you’re having to fix things FOR MOTU. makes his point

Stupid geek tricks how to make mac os x get weird

Post by Frodo » Sun Aug 06, 2006 8:13 pm

If I might chime in, one must determine if the problem is universal, fairly widespread, sporadic, or mostly isolated to a modicum of users.

With evidence that a particular driver may be more useful for solving one issue or another, the issue remains as to if/when/whether MOTU can even reproduce the problem. It’s doubtful that MOTU runs tests with a combo of devices and third-party add-ons that users are most likely using for the sake of reporting compatibility and other conflicts– if they are running such tests at all. It’s more likely that MOTU is running the latest version of OSX and the latest version of DP and its associated drivers and plugins on systems that are “MOTU pristine”.

The sludge simply rolls downhill. Users point to MOTU, MOTU points to third-party vendors, and everyone points at Apple who proceeds with constantly rearranging the furniture for developers and users and tossing the sludge right back into everyone else’s laps to sort out. What remains is a lack of that once-and-for-all solution that works for everyone. Doubtful anymore that such a thing exists.

I am convinced that each DAW carries its own Pandora’s Box of issues– whether DAW ‘A’ works better in one area a user needs than DAW ‘B’ can impact on one’s overall impression of how things are really working. There’s just no way to get an accurate take on what’s going on.

Of course, we are just hours away from new promises of “the next greatest thing” in Apple technology. To be honest, I’m suffering a bit from geek fatigue to get very excited about it because with every release of “the next greatest thing” there appears a series of threads of new problems from users who don’t always agree on what the problem is, what the source of the problem is, and what the solution(s) might be.

The only reliable pattern I’ve seen follows a scenario akin to:

DP 4.6 is out.
DP 4.6 sucks.
DP 4.52 was better (after it sucked)
DP 4.61 is out.
DP 4.60 was better (after it sucked)
DP 5 is out.
DP 5 sucks.
DP 5.01 is out.
Dp 5.01 is great.
DP 5.01 sucks
DP 5.1 is out.
DP 5.1 is faster.
DP 5.1 is slower.
DP 4.61 is better (after it sucked)

Stupid geek tricks how to make mac os x get weird

Just over four years ago, Apple unveiled a new Mac Pro that it swore would reinvent the concept of a workstation. The new system was definitely daring — it ditched internal expansion for six Thunderbolt 2 ports and told users with internal hard drives to buy new external chassis and use those instead. It shipped with dual graphics cards as a standard, despite how Apple has never demonstrated aptitude or interest in pushing GPU-centric computing (the company’s operating systems have been stuck supporting ancient versions of OpenGL for years now).

Today, the company finally took a small step towards upgrading the current Mac Pro design, but it also acknowledged what we’ve all known for years — the trash can aesthetic of the 2013 Mac Pro makes it a serious pain to work with. As of today, Apple has tweaked the Mac Pro to include a six-core CPU (up from four) in the $2,999 model and an eight-core CPU (up from six) in the $3,999 model. The GPUs have also been slightly updated; the $2,999 system now ships with dual D500s, while the $3,999 rig ships with dual D700s. Given that these are GCN 1.0 GPUs with the D700 equivalent to AMD’s old HD 7970, we can’t really recommend them.

According to Daring Fireball, Apple is planning a major overhaul to its Mac Pro lineup next year, with a more modular design and a product that’s easier to update. As for why the Mac Pro hasn’t been updated for four years, here’s DF’s explanation:

Let’s say you’re Apple. You’re faced with the following problem. Three years ago you launched a radical new lineup of Mac Pros. For multiple reasons, you haven’t shipped an update to those machines since. At some point you came to the conclusion that the 2013 Mac Pro concept was fundamentally flawed… [T]hat tight integration made it hard to update regularly. The idea that expansion could be handled almost entirely by external Thunderbolt peripherals sounded good on paper, but hasn’t panned out in practice. And the GPU design was a bad prediction. Apple bet on a dual-GPU design (multiple smaller GPUs, with “pro”-level performance coming from parallel processing) but the industry has gone largely in the other direction (machines with one big GPU).

It’s rather frustrating to see corporations declare, years after the fact, that things end users immediately called out as problems are actually, you know, problems. Heck, Apple’s workstation competitors have been mocking its design with salient points about the limitations of the trash can since the platform shipped four years ago, as captured in the ad below by Boxx:

I respect Apple for trying to build something new and unusual, I truly do. But the Mac Pro went too far in the wrong direction in its quest to establish itself as unique and different. A whisper-quiet workstation with high-end peripherals is a noble goal, but not if it fundamentally handicaps both the end-user and the corporation that designed it from upgrading the underlying platform.

While Apple has upgraded the Xeons inside the Mac Pro, we recommend against making a purchase until more information is available on what these chips can do. While clock speeds on modern chips have scarcely budged since 2013, certain capabilities, like AVX2, still may not be available. It depends on whether Apple stuck with Ivy Bridge-era Xeons (as I’m guessing they did) or actually updated to a more recent iteration of Intel’s Core architecture.

Apple’s new, “completely rethought” Mac Pro will be available next year, as will a new “Pro” display. Maybe by then, the (presumably) next-gen Oculus Rift will support it?

Git is case-sensitive and your filesystem may not be – Weird folder merging on Windows

I was working on DasBlog Core (an .NET Core cross-platform update of the ASP.NET WebForms-based blogging software that runs this blog) with Mark Downie, the new project manager, and Shayne Boyer. This is part of a larger cloud re-architecture of hanselman.com and the systems that run this whole site.

Shayne was working on getting a DasBlog Core CI/CD (Continuous Integration/Continuous Development) running in Azure DevOps’ build system. We wanted individual build pipelines to confirm that DasBlog Core was in fact, cross-platform, so we needed to build, test, and run it on Windows, Linux, and Mac.

The build was working great on Windows and Mac. but failing on Linux. Why?

Well, like all things, it’s complex.

  • Windows has a case-insensitive file system.
  • By default, Mac uses a case-insensitive file system.

Since Git 1.5ish there’s been a setting

but you should always be aware of what a setting does before you just set it.

If you’re not careful, you or someone on your team can create a case sensitive file path in your git index while you’re using a case insensitive operating system like Windows or Mac. If you do this, you’ll be able to end up with two separate entries from git’s perspective. However Windows will silently merge them and see just one.

Here’s our themes folder structure as seen on GitHub.com.

Stupid geek tricks how to make mac os x get weird

But when we clone it on Mac or Windows, we see just one folder.

Stupid geek tricks how to make mac os x get weird

Turns out that six months ago one of us introduced another folder with the name dasblog while the original was DasBlog. When we checked them on Mac or Windows the files ended up in merged into one folder, but on Linux they were/are two, so the build fails.

You can fix this in a few ways. You can rename the file in a case-sensitive way and commit the change:

Please take care and back up anything you don’t understand.

If you’re renaming a directory, you’ll do a two stage rename with a temp name.

Be safe out there!

Sponsor: Looking for a tool for performance profiling, unit test coverage, and continuous testing that works cross-platform on Windows, macOS, and Linux? Check out the latest JetBrains Rider!

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Stupid geek tricks how to make mac os x get weird

The popularity of video streaming services has taken off in the past few years. It’s become easier to stream video through smart TVs, streaming boxes that connect to your not-so-smart TV, and even streaming sticks. These devices let you stream video through popular apps like Hulu, Netflix, SlingTV, Amazon Prime Video, and YouTube TV. Unfortunately, there are other apps that let you watch illegal pirated content. And hackers are using those apps to spread malware. Here’s what you need to know.

Illegal pirated content is nothing new. We’ve alerted you that websites offering free movies and TV shows can infect your computer with malware. But the landscape is shifting. Purveyors of pirated content are now spreading apps and add-ons that work with popular streaming devices. If you download one of these illegal pirate apps or add-ons, the chances are good that you’ll also download malware.

If malicious software on the pirate app gets inside your wireless network, it may try to infect other devices connected to your network. That could put at risk the computer you use for sensitive transactions like online banking or shopping. It could also expose your photos and other personal information. The malware could allow hackers to:

  • Steal your credit card information and sell it to other hackers on the dark web.
  • Steal the log in credentials for sites you shop on and go on a spending spree.
  • Steal the log in credentials for your bank account and steal your money.
  • Use your computer to commit crimes.

Malware may also make your computer slow or non-responsive, serve pop-up windows or ads, or take you to sites you didn’t want to visit.

If you want to avoid downloading malware when you stream video, don’t watch pirated content. Period. Not online and not through a video streaming device.

If you get malware on your computer, update your computer’s security software and then run a scan.

Installing multiple font variants (bold, semibold, light, etc) on OSX using fontbook results in warnings and the font variants are all in separate “font families” ..

I tried installing multiple patched fonts (both Hack and Source Code Pro) so that should rule out that a single patched font is causing the issue.

Stupid geek tricks how to make mac os x get weird

As can be seen in the screenshot, multiple font families are created for the font variants while I expect a single font family named Sauce Code Pro containing all the variants. Also all the fonts are named: “NerdFontCompleteMono”

I hope we can sort this out because I really want to use the awesome glyphs in my setup

The text was updated successfully, but these errors were encountered:

ryanoasis commented Feb 17, 2016

Yes this should be fixed.. thanks for the details here.

I don’t have a mac to test on but perhaps I can setup a test branch where others can try it out 😄

thewatts commented Feb 18, 2016

Looks like it’s still an issue (shown after installing master )

thewatts commented Feb 18, 2016

Which, I must say – this project is LEGIT. Really thankful for it!

ryanoasis commented Feb 18, 2016

Yes this should be fixed.. thanks for the details here

Err I apologize for not making my point clear. 😊 What I meant here was that this should get fixed not that it already was fixed. i.e. Yes this is still a problem AFAIK 👍

I will be leaving this ticket open until someone can confirm an attempted fix 😄

Which, I must say – this project is LEGIT. Really thankful for it!

Thanks! That means a lot

ryanoasis commented Feb 22, 2016

I will be pushing up a test branch that should address this issue. Maybe even as early as tomorrow if I get time.

I will link to it on this ticket when I do.

eugenesvk commented Feb 23, 2016

@ryanoasis I think this is an issue with FontForge not giving scripts access to font style names (fontforge/fontforge#1061) and relying on autogessing style. Hence you get very strange styles in your fonts such as NerdFontComplete instead of Regular .
The resulting PS Font Name ( $fontname set to fontname + Suffix in your patcher) is identical for all different styles (e.g. SauceCodeProNerdFontComplete for both Regular and Medium instead of SauceCodeProNerdComplete-Regular and SauceCodeProNerdComplete-Medium ) and Mac throws this error.

After I’ve used your script to generate the required fonts the only perfect solution to the naming mess I’ve found was to use FontLab

  1. set a proper Family name (e.g. Sauce Code ProNerdC for the ‘Complete’ version) — this would be the same for all the generated fonts with a given variation of extra glyph sets
  2. Auto-generate everything with 3 buttons ( Build Style Name , Build Names , and Build OpenType Names ) to get clean names
  3. Propagate these changes by clicking ‘Import Names’ in Additional OpenType Names
  4. Generate a clean set of files like SauceCodeProNerdC-MediumItalic.ttf

Then, you’d get the following clean names (based on Source Code Medium Italic)
Family Name: Sauce Code ProNerdC
Style Name: Medium Italic
PS Font Name (the one that was conflicting on a Mac): SauceCodeProNerdC-MediumItalic (it gets automatically shortened to e.g. “It” if it’s >

32 symbols)
Full Name: Sauce Code ProNerdC Medium Italic
(OT-Specific names) Mac Name: Sauce Code ProNerdC Medium Italic (though I’m not sure where these OT-specific names are relevant)

No more naming conflicts, no more “NerdFontComplete” in drop-down menus in apps!
Now, this could also be accomplished in FontForge GUI, but would be much more cumbersome. When FontForge allows access by scripts to style names as well, this could all be automated in a script.

I think it might be even possible as is if you can try to guess a style name from a file name or font properties and try to trick FontForge into reading a specially constructed full name (with a hyphen separating name from style) to write the correct style name, but I don’t know how FontForge autoguess is working

Apple has confirmed it will be discontinuing its iMac Pro lineup.

On Friday, March 5, Mac Rumors noticed Apple had added a ‘while supplies last’ notice to its iMac Pro product page and removed all optional upgrade options. In the past, Apple has done this in advance of a product or product line is being discontinued.

Mac Rumors then published a follow-up article yesterday, March 6, to say it’s since confirmed with Apple the iMac Pro lineup will no longer be available once the current supply runs out. Mac Rumors didn’t specifically quote the Apple representative it spoke with, but did have the following to say regarding the rationale for this discontinuation:

Apple says the latest 27-inch iMac introduced in August is the preferred choice for the vast majority of pro iMac users, and said customers who need even more performance and expandability can choose the Mac Pro.’

The 27″ iMac Pro was first released back in December 2017 and was meant to be a more powerful version of Apple’s longstanding iMac line. Since its release, the iMac Pro line has been a popular choice for creative professionals, due to its all-in-one design that matched impressive specifications with a high-quality display. The last iMac update was introduced in August 2020 and featured a 5K display, with up to a 10-core 10th-generation Intel Core i9 processor, up to 8TB of storage, up to an AMD Radeon Pro 5700 XT GPU and the option to upgrade to a 10 Gigabit Ethernet port.

Going forward, it sounds as though users will have the option to go with Apple’s standard iMac lineup or upgrade to the more powerful and modular Mac Pro if the iMac options don’t cut it. Apple is expected to announce new iMacs — and potentially a new Mac Pro — powered by its own chipsets after dropping Intel and releasing its M1-powered Mac Mini, MacBook Air and 13” MacBook Pro computers back in November.

Things I have to do to keep my laptop running so I can google how to fix other things

  • computers are awful
  • macos

See also command lines it is tedious to remember for general POSIX commands.

⚠️ Most of these commands are supposed to be run sudo root, and each may irremediably ruin your computer, your life, and soil everything you have ever loved. Certainly, some of them have done that for me. Then it might challenge you to a break dance battle, I dunno. None of that will be my responsibility. The only guarantee I provide here is that stuff helped me at least one time.

So many of these were filesystem-specific hacks that I broke out those into a specific filesystem-specific hacks section. And others were about easing the pains of using macOS in the low-bandwidth majority world or macOS server.

The remaining tips are arranged so that the further you get down the list the longer it has been since I have needed to know it; the later ones probably don’t work on modern macOS.

OCR from screen

macOS supports an OCR system called Live Text which notionally means any time I can see text on the screen I should be able to copy and paste it (e.g. I should be able to use links that I see in a video chat). However, only some apps seem to support this feature, so I end up doing circuitous round trips from screenshots to supported apps. There are better ways.

This is a good solution for me because I have a terminal open 100% of the time. I have also noticed Extract Text from a Screenshot with Shortcuts but I cannot work out where to download it. ltxlouis has a Siri-based solution but that just leads me to a download page for an app that claim that Siri does not work on my laptop, which is weird because it is RIGHT THERE.

Gatekeeper

What an ongoing mess.

Desktop wallpaper

Various scrappy fan communities make animated wallpaper.

Here is a command-line app for stitching together “dynamic“ (ie..e time-of-day-sensitive) wallpaper: mczachurski/wallpapper: Console application for creating dynamic wallpapers for macOS Mojave and newer Dynamic Wallpaper club hosts a user-generated Gallery of pretty things and also instruction.

For pre-rolled wallpapers for the busy see

    (free) (AUD 15 but very pretty; but also limited selection; too much coast for my liking)

Meta tips

Mr Bishop’s Awesome MacOs Command Line lists how to fix a great many things from the keyboard. Previously on github, but that is now mostly a page about his grumpiness at lazy github drive-bys contributors.

iMessage doesn’t know how country prefixes work any longer

Apparently we now need to manually add country prefixes to any phone numbers in our inbox that arrive without country prefixes? Here is a script to add country code to OS X Address book entries:

Note that it only works in versions of Macos before 12.1 because that is when Apple broke scripting for the Contacts app.

Dock disconnects hard drives when mac sleeps

  • System Preferences > Energy Saver
  • Power Adapter tab
  • Uncheck “Enable Power Nap while plugged into a power adapter
  1. Open System Preferences.
  2. Click the Energy Saver icon.
  3. By default the ‘Put hard disks to sleep when possible’ option will be selected. Uncheck this option.

Error beeps are laptop farts

I hate user interface beeps in general. I REALLY hate them being played promiscuously through arbitrary bluetooth devices. I have done my best to turn them off.

to the last I grapple with thee; from hell’s heart I stab at thee; for hate’s sake I spit my last breath at thee.

I do not want them. If they really must play themselves, they can play on my laptop’s internal speakers thank you very much. Even better would be the laptop speakers of someone else. Maybe a convicted criminal who needs this kind of low-level irritation as part of their state-mandated punishment? Or Apple bluetooth devs needing operant conditioning I particularly do not want beeps on audio outputs to which they are not invited and have never been invited.

MacOS audio alerts, though are rude intruders. For me, every time a new bluetooth audio device or HDMI device is connected (or reconnects because a bird flies past or an angel sighs), MacOS will use it for error beeps and miscellaneous notifications. Ths OS is a sex pest when it comes to bluetooth devices, constantly attempting to interfere with them by non-consensual error beep interference. This is incredibly uncomfortable to be around.

Or: A macos beep is a guy who gets in the elevator with me, farts, then leaves again before the door closes. Why did that guy come here just to fart? He did not get anything out of it. Could he not have farted somewhere else? I could have tolerated him farting if he had not made it weird, but now it’s weird because he came in here and farted pointedly at me so I’m kind of obligated to be offended I guess?

Here are two apps that claim to prevent macos from imposing its error beeps on random devices:

Stupid geek tricks how to make mac os x get weird

Usually, a type of skill reapplication: the power has utilities which no one but the Weak, but Skilled hero recognizes. Occasionally the main power isn’t the awesome part, it’s the Required Secondary Powers needed to have it work in a remotely logical way. note For instance, an aquatic hero might seem useless out of water, but their superhuman swim speed, ability to withstand crushing ocean pressures, and ability to see and hear clearly in the murky depths means they possess heightened agility, strength, and senses (in addition to any other fishy powers they might possess like razor claws or bioelectricity), all of which can serve them just as well on dry land. Sometimes justified with the powers only becoming effective over time, or that they are only effective under certain conditions — however then they pay off handsomely.

Sometimes the character does not realize the usefulness of the skill until later, in which case it is a Chekhov’s Skill. Might involve a Chekhov’s Classroom on the lines of: “Sure, my only power is to control X. but you forget that Y is X too.”

Might be An Aesop to make the most of what you have. Especially ironic if another character had, or could have had the same ability before, but decided that it was useless.

The video game version is usually a Lethal Joke Character, and sometimes Difficult, but Awesome. Sister Trope to Lethal Harmless Powers, where normally useful but inoffensive powers turn out to be able to really hurt others. See also the Inverse Law of Complexity to Power, which can be why these powers become useful. Semantic Superpowers often seem like this initially, before the implications of just how broadly they can be applied become clear.

Compare Magikarp Power, which truly is useless at first, but eventually ascends to extreme power through hard work and/or patience. Contrast Weaksauce Weakness and Logical Weakness, in which otherwise strong powers contain vulnerabilities that make their wielders not as effective as they might seem. Do not confuse this with Flight, Strength, Heart, where the character has a relatively useless power, and also an awesome power. If the power is truly useless outside the highly restrictive conditions of an Eigen Plot contrived to make it useful, then This Looks Like a Job for Aquaman.

Despite the name, this trope is not explicitly about The Heart or The Power of Love but that can happen.